Message Boards Message Boards
Combination View Flat View Tree View
Threads [ Previous | Next ]
Dicussion Question #1
toggle
Dicussion Question #1 Ian Lindsay 4/4/12 10:25 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Emory Bowen 4/5/12 8:33 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Victoria Siracusa 4/6/12 7:18 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 kylie isabelle verrengia 4/7/12 7:22 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Samuel Parade 4/8/12 8:42 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Alyssa Hansen 4/8/12 10:54 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Kaylee Danaher 4/9/12 1:09 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 James Hayden 4/6/12 1:19 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Randal Edwards 4/8/12 12:33 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Joseph Pilver 4/8/12 8:10 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Brendan Sweeney 4/9/12 10:57 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Victoria Siracusa 4/6/12 7:03 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Nicole Parenchuck 4/7/12 6:03 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Nicole Parenchuck 4/7/12 5:37 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Amber Baig 4/8/12 11:56 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 kylie isabelle verrengia 4/7/12 8:13 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 James Hayden 4/7/12 11:53 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Emory Bowen 4/9/12 2:05 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Kelby McCooey 4/9/12 4:07 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Randal Edwards 4/7/12 10:37 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Joseph Pilver 4/8/12 7:59 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Jessica Cascio 4/8/12 11:12 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 John Moore 4/9/12 12:01 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Adam Busa 4/9/12 2:29 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Samuel Parade 4/8/12 8:38 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Alyssa Hansen 4/8/12 10:46 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Danielle Humphreys 4/8/12 11:49 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Jessica Cascio 4/8/12 10:59 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Danielle Humphreys 4/8/12 11:43 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 John Moore 4/8/12 11:49 PM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Samantha Briscoe 4/9/12 12:04 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Griffin Cassata 4/9/12 12:35 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Griffin Cassata 4/9/12 12:19 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Eric Shimchick 4/9/12 1:08 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Jake Filthaut 4/9/12 12:28 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Zachary Rodegher 4/9/12 12:57 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Anthony Hale 4/9/12 1:01 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Kaylee Danaher 4/9/12 12:52 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Anthony Hale 4/9/12 1:07 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Tyler Brett 4/9/12 1:09 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Alexandra Burgess 4/9/12 2:13 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Eric Shimchick 4/9/12 12:54 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Tyler Brett 4/9/12 12:56 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Benjamin Lawrence 4/9/12 2:02 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Anthony Hale 4/9/12 12:59 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Benjamin Lawrence 4/9/12 1:57 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Alexandra Burgess 4/9/12 2:09 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Abigail Forsyth 4/9/12 2:31 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Adam Busa 4/9/12 2:11 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Abigail Forsyth 4/9/12 2:17 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Kelby McCooey 4/9/12 3:17 AM
RE: Dicussion Question #1 Brendan Sweeney 4/9/12 10:51 AM
Dicussion Question #1
4/4/12 10:25 PM
Before we started To Kill A Mockingbird, we discussed the idea of coming-of-age. This idea focused on learning something new about ourselves, the world around us, and how society works through some kind of experience or interaction. Our two main protagonists, Jem and Scout, have had a wide range of experinces thus far, yet are still learning. In a well-developed paragraph for each character, discuss a coming-of-age lesson that both Scout and Jem have learned by the conclusion of Chapters 1-14. Be sure to state what that lesson is, use textual support from the novel to illustrate your point, and make a prediction on how it may affect them throughout the rest of the novel. (Click 'Reply' to answer this prompt)

After writing your response, comment on another one of your peer's posts. Offer your reaction to it in a one paragraph response. Do this by clicking the "Reply with Quote" option, so we know who you are responding to.

Best of luck! (Due by 11:55 pm Sunday April 8th)
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/5/12 8:33 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout learns the lesson that you cant fight someone just because they said something insulting. At the begining of the book she hits Francis because of what he calls her father. After talks with her father she realizes that fighting isnt going to help her. This is her "coming of age". She grows more mature about dealing with people talking about her father. At school she was teased about it and had to think back at what her father had told her. "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner i learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be." (pg. 74). You can tell that she is becoming more mature because she remembers what her father tells her. She takes a moment to think about what she is about to do. Later on in the book, When Scout and Jem are walking to the store, Mrs. Dubose calls their father the same thing Francis had. Scout resists going over and hitting her. This is when you can tell she is really "coming of age.".


Jem learned alot about controling his anger too. When he couldnt handle Mrs. Dubose's comment about his father, Jem ruins her garden. Responsibility is an important thing to learn as you grow older. It has alot to do with "coming of age" because you have to be responsible when your older. Jems father tells him to go appologize to mrs. Dubose and so he does. "She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and read to her out loud for two hours."(pg 105). Jem didnt want to do this but he followed through because that was his consequence. This showed how Jem was becoming more mature.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/6/12 1:19 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Both the characters of Jem and Scout learn many a lesson in (what one could call) "Act 1" of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird"

The protagonist, Jean Louise "Scout" Finch learns a good deal about life in the first part of this story. On her first day of school, Scout gets into trouble with her teacher, Miss Caroline, due to the fact that Scout is already literate, eliminating a majority of Miss Caroline's job of teaching the six-year-old. She, in turn, goes to her father for advice on the matter, not wanting to stop reading all together as instructed by her teacher. Upon hearing Scout's unfair and biased judging of Miss Caroline, Atticus gives Scout this piece of advice which she shows to take to heart in later chapters: "You'll never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb in his skin and walk around in it."(Pg 30). This is what one could consider a classic take on the proverb: "Don't judge a person until you walk a mile in their shoes.", meaning that if you truly do not know what a person's life is/has been like, you hold no right to judge them for their actions. Perhaps this will affect her opinion regarding the upcoming trial? There is no other way to find out but to read on.
.
Also, the (what one may call the deautagonist) brother of Scout, Jeremy Atticus "Jem" Finch has learned many lessons in his escapades throughout this novel by Harper Lee. Jem could be described as a boy trying to be a man. He tries to act tough, going out of his way to prove his masculinity to others, even going to touch the infamous Radley house in a dare from Dill, showing how he defines courage through childish and possible dangerous acts. However, later in the book, he is taught be Atticus what true courage is, that being to stand up to adversity despite how hard it is. This is shown when Atticus forces Jem to go to the house of Mrs. Dubose and read to her as payment for crushing the woman's flowers. After Mrs. Dubose dies, Atticus explains his reasoning to Jem: ""I wanted you to see something about her-I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do." (Page 112) Perhaps this lesson in courage will cause Jem to make more mature decisions in the future, regarding himself,his sister, his family, and all of those around him.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/6/12 7:03 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
In "To Kill a Mockingbird", Jean Louise Finch, or Scout, had a coming of age lesson when she did not realize that Walter Cunningham and her family were "poor". This is a lesson for Scout because when she was at school, she would make fun of Walter and beat him up at recess even when Atticus does not like when Scout uses her fighting skills to an innocent person. When Miss Caroline asked the class to put their lunch on top of their desk, she realized that Walter was the only one who did not either raise his hand for going home to eat lunch or bring his lunch to school. Miss Caroline offered Walter money but he refused to take and Scout was brave to tell Miss Caroline that he was a Cunningham. Scout said "I rose graciously on Walter's behalf: 'Ah Miss Caroline?' 'What is it, Jean Louise?' 'Miss Caroline, he's a Cunningham.'"[pg 20] This quote is showing that Scout is telling Miss Caroline that he a Cunningham and a Cunningham, to Scout, will never take anything from people if they can't pay it back, but instead they use what they have and live off of what they have. This is showing that Scout is making a point that all Cunningham's are poor, and she is making a joke out it if you put it in Walter's point of view because maybe he did not want Miss Caroline to know that he was poor or to have other students make fun of him for that, including Scout. Scout once asked Atticus why the Cunningham's were poor and if the Finch's were as poor as they were, here is a quote "One morning Jem and I found a load of stovewood in the back yard. Later, a sack of hickory nuts appeared on the back steps. With Christmas came a crate of smilax and holly. That spring when we found a crokersack full of turnip greens, Atticus said Mr. Cunningham had more than paid him. 'Why does he pay you like that?' I asked. 'Because that's the only way he can pay me. He has no money.' 'Are we poor, Atticus?' Atticus nodded. 'We are indeed.' Jem's nose wrinkled. 'Are we as poor as the Cunningham's?' 'Not exactly. The Cunningham's are country folks, farmers, and the crash hit them the hardest."[pg 20-21] Scout never made fun of him again because when Jem invited him over for dinner and she saw him pour syrup on the pile of food on his plate and she kept saying that he kept drowning in his food and Calpurinia told her off by telling Scout that there are some folks who don't eats the way the Finch's do. Scout finally realized that everyone is poor in Maycomb because of the economy since the Great Depression was happening during this time period and they too were poor, but as poor as the Cunningham's and she realized that she took everything for granted and did not realize how awful the Cunningham's lived compared to her, she never made fun of Walter ever again.

In "To Kill a Mockingbird", Jeremy Finch, or Jem, had a coming of age lesson when he realized you should not intrude in other people's house's or owned land. This is a lesson because when Jem and Dill had the idea of sneaking into the Radley's yard and to look through the window to try see if they can get a look of what boo Radley looked liked, they believed that this would be a good idea since no one would see them and no one would find out. But in the end, they were seen by a man with a hat, Mr. Nathan Radley, who came from the Radley house when Jeam was on the porch. When Jem, Scout, and Dill went into the Radley yard, there was a porch that ran across the width of the house, two doors and two dark windows. When Dill coudn't see anything in the window he looked through, Jem tried to look through one of the windows on the porch, but since the porch was so squeaky, it woke up the man with the hat, but all Scout saw was a shadow. Jem ran and told Dill and Scout to run with him through the schoolyard fence, and while running, they heard a shotgun that roared through the neighborhood. But when Scout and Dill went through the fence fine, they saw Jem having trouble getting through and he was trying to wiggle through but his pants were stuck on the fence. Jem finally got through the fence but the problem was that his pants were still tangled in the fence, leaving him pant less. When the three of them went through Deer Pasture, they saw all of the neighbors circle around the Radley's gate and with Mr. Nathan Radley inside his gate with the shotgun in his hand. Jem, Scout and Dill went over to the crowd and pretended to not know what was going on and Jem aked Miss Maudie what happened, forgetting he did not have his pants. "'What happened?' Jem asked. 'Mr. Radley shot at a Negro in his collard patch.' 'Oh. Did he hit him?' 'No,' said Miss Stephanie. 'Shot in the air. Scared him pale, though. Says if anybody sees a white nigger around, that's the one. Says he's got the other barrel waitn' for the next sound he hears in that patch, an' next time he won't aim high, be it dog, nigger, or-Jem Finch!"'[pg 54] Miss Stephanie knew that it was Jem because he saw he did not have his pants since they were in the fence, but Dill told Atticus that that they were playing strip poker by the fishpool making an alibi for Jem, Scout and himself so they won't get in trouble. Atticus did believe in Dill and was still mad. But Jem still felt unsafe without his pants and went to retrieve them with Scout and he found them waiting for him, neatly folded and sewed where he ripped them in the gate. The lesson that Jem had learned from this is that not to sneak into someone's yard at night even if you expect no one to find you because in the end, someone is always watching and will get you in trouble. And Jem also learned not to lie because he felt very unsafe without his pants, but still relieved that he did not get in trouble for that but still he wanted to know if he could get rid of the evidence, when someone already found the evidence for him.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/6/12 7:18 PM as a reply to Emory Bowen.
Emory Bowen:
Scout learns the lesson that you cant fight someone just because they said something insulting. At the begining of the book she hits Francis because of what he calls her father. After talks with her father she realizes that fighting isnt going to help her. This is her "coming of age". She grows more mature about dealing with people talking about her father. At school she was teased about it and had to think back at what her father had told her. "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner i learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be." (pg. 74). You can tell that she is becoming more mature because she remembers what her father tells her. She takes a moment to think about what she is about to do. Later on in the book, When Scout and Jem are walking to the store, Mrs. Dubose calls their father the same thing Francis had. Scout resists going over and hitting her. This is when you can tell she is really "coming of age.".


Jem learned alot about controling his anger too. When he couldnt handle Mrs. Dubose's comment about his father, Jem ruins her garden. Responsibility is an important thing to learn as you grow older. It has alot to do with "coming of age" because you have to be responsible when your older. Jems father tells him to go appologize to mrs. Dubose and so he does. "She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and read to her out loud for two hours."(pg 105). Jem didnt want to do this but he followed through because that was his consequence. This showed how Jem was becoming more mature.



I agree with your coming of age examples for Scout and Jem because Scout does need to stop her fighting because in order for her to mature, she needs to hold her temper too when it someone one makes a comment about her or her family. When Francis and Mrs. Dubose called her father "nigger-lover", she probably wanted to hurt Mrs. Dubose but learned from when she hurt Francis when he called her father that because she did not want to get in trouble for one thing and for another, she wanted to mature and go past the rude comments by her fellow neighbors or other people. Jem defiantly learned a lot with his anger because he realized that if his anger gets the best of him, then he would get angry more easily and the outcome of his anger won't turn out the way he wants to. I thought Atticus was very smart for telling Jem to apologize to Mrs. Dubose because he knew that Jem needed to learn from his mistakes so that it would never happen ever again. And the punishment that Mrs. Dubose gave him was genius I thought because that would defiantly make Jem learn to control his and anger and realize how it affects not only him but other people. I believe that these two points for Scout and Jem are perfect examples for the coming of ages.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/7/12 5:37 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
An example of Scout coming-of-age is when Calpurnia angerly talks to Scout when Walter Cunningham is eating at their house. On page 24, Scout says," But he's gone and drowned his dinner in syrup." Calpurnia answered this by saying calling Scout to the kitchen and telling her that some people do not eat like her, and she should respect her company. On page 24, Calpurnia says,"There's some folks who don't eat like us, but you ain't called on to contradict 'em at the table when they don't. That boy's yo' comp'ny and if he wants to eat up the table cloth you let him, you hear?" Scout learns to respect everyone who comes to her house, by being polite and keeping rude thoughts to herself. This lesson will help Scout become more mature, and teach her to respect everyone.

An example of Jem coming-of-age is when Atticus teaches him about courage. On page 112, Atticus said,"I wanted you to see something about her- I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand." This helped Jem understand that sometimes small acts of kindness like reading to Mrs. Dubose, who was sick and frightening to the children, takes a large amount of courage. Jem learned the lesson to help those in need, and that you do not need to be a superhero to be courageous. I think this will cause Jem to act less childish, and to help more people in need.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/7/12 6:03 PM as a reply to Victoria Siracusa.
Victoria Siracusa:
In "To Kill a Mockingbird", Jean Louise Finch, or Scout, had a coming of age lesson when she did not realize that Walter Cunningham and her family were "poor". This is a lesson for Scout because when she was at school, she would make fun of Walter and beat him up at recess even when Atticus does not like when Scout uses her fighting skills to an innocent person. When Miss Caroline asked the class to put their lunch on top of their desk, she realized that Walter was the only one who did not either raise his hand for going home to eat lunch or bring his lunch to school. Miss Caroline offered Walter money but he refused to take and Scout was brave to tell Miss Caroline that he was a Cunningham. Scout said "I rose graciously on Walter's behalf: 'Ah Miss Caroline?' 'What is it, Jean Louise?' 'Miss Caroline, he's a Cunningham.'"[pg 20] This quote is showing that Scout is telling Miss Caroline that he a Cunningham and a Cunningham, to Scout, will never take anything from people if they can't pay it back, but instead they use what they have and live off of what they have. This is showing that Scout is making a point that all Cunningham's are poor, and she is making a joke out it if you put it in Walter's point of view because maybe he did not want Miss Caroline to know that he was poor or to have other students make fun of him for that, including Scout. Scout once asked Atticus why the Cunningham's were poor and if the Finch's were as poor as they were, here is a quote "One morning Jem and I found a load of stovewood in the back yard. Later, a sack of hickory nuts appeared on the back steps. With Christmas came a crate of smilax and holly. That spring when we found a crokersack full of turnip greens, Atticus said Mr. Cunningham had more than paid him. 'Why does he pay you like that?' I asked. 'Because that's the only way he can pay me. He has no money.' 'Are we poor, Atticus?' Atticus nodded. 'We are indeed.' Jem's nose wrinkled. 'Are we as poor as the Cunningham's?' 'Not exactly. The Cunningham's are country folks, farmers, and the crash hit them the hardest."[pg 20-21] Scout never made fun of him again because when Jem invited him over for dinner and she saw him pour syrup on the pile of food on his plate and she kept saying that he kept drowning in his food and Calpurinia told her off by telling Scout that there are some folks who don't eats the way the Finch's do. Scout finally realized that everyone is poor in Maycomb because of the economy since the Great Depression was happening during this time period and they too were poor, but as poor as the Cunningham's and she realized that she took everything for granted and did not realize how awful the Cunningham's lived compared to her, she never made fun of Walter ever again.

In "To Kill a Mockingbird", Jeremy Finch, or Jem, had a coming of age lesson when he realized you should not intrude in other people's house's or owned land. This is a lesson because when Jem and Dill had the idea of sneaking into the Radley's yard and to look through the window to try see if they can get a look of what boo Radley looked liked, they believed that this would be a good idea since no one would see them and no one would find out. But in the end, they were seen by a man with a hat, Mr. Nathan Radley, who came from the Radley house when Jeam was on the porch. When Jem, Scout, and Dill went into the Radley yard, there was a porch that ran across the width of the house, two doors and two dark windows. When Dill coudn't see anything in the window he looked through, Jem tried to look through one of the windows on the porch, but since the porch was so squeaky, it woke up the man with the hat, but all Scout saw was a shadow. Jem ran and told Dill and Scout to run with him through the schoolyard fence, and while running, they heard a shotgun that roared through the neighborhood. But when Scout and Dill went through the fence fine, they saw Jem having trouble getting through and he was trying to wiggle through but his pants were stuck on the fence. Jem finally got through the fence but the problem was that his pants were still tangled in the fence, leaving him pant less. When the three of them went through Deer Pasture, they saw all of the neighbors circle around the Radley's gate and with Mr. Nathan Radley inside his gate with the shotgun in his hand. Jem, Scout and Dill went over to the crowd and pretended to not know what was going on and Jem aked Miss Maudie what happened, forgetting he did not have his pants. "'What happened?' Jem asked. 'Mr. Radley shot at a Negro in his collard patch.' 'Oh. Did he hit him?' 'No,' said Miss Stephanie. 'Shot in the air. Scared him pale, though. Says if anybody sees a white nigger around, that's the one. Says he's got the other barrel waitn' for the next sound he hears in that patch, an' next time he won't aim high, be it dog, nigger, or-Jem Finch!"'[pg 54] Miss Stephanie knew that it was Jem because he saw he did not have his pants since they were in the fence, but Dill told Atticus that that they were playing strip poker by the fishpool making an alibi for Jem, Scout and himself so they won't get in trouble. Atticus did believe in Dill and was still mad. But Jem still felt unsafe without his pants and went to retrieve them with Scout and he found them waiting for him, neatly folded and sewed where he ripped them in the gate. The lesson that Jem had learned from this is that not to sneak into someone's yard at night even if you expect no one to find you because in the end, someone is always watching and will get you in trouble. And Jem also learned not to lie because he felt very unsafe without his pants, but still relieved that he did not get in trouble for that but still he wanted to know if he could get rid of the evidence, when someone already found the evidence for him.
Victoria Siracusa:
In "To Kill a Mockingbird", Jean Louise Finch, or Scout, had a coming of age lesson when she did not realize that Walter Cunningham and her family were "poor". This is a lesson for Scout because when she was at school, she would make fun of Walter and beat him up at recess even when Atticus does not like when Scout uses her fighting skills to an innocent person. When Miss Caroline asked the class to put their lunch on top of their desk, she realized that Walter was the only one who did not either raise his hand for going home to eat lunch or bring his lunch to school. Miss Caroline offered Walter money but he refused to take and Scout was brave to tell Miss Caroline that he was a Cunningham. Scout said "I rose graciously on Walter's behalf: 'Ah Miss Caroline?' 'What is it, Jean Louise?' 'Miss Caroline, he's a Cunningham.'"[pg 20] This quote is showing that Scout is telling Miss Caroline that he a Cunningham and a Cunningham, to Scout, will never take anything from people if they can't pay it back, but instead they use what they have and live off of what they have. This is showing that Scout is making a point that all Cunningham's are poor, and she is making a joke out it if you put it in Walter's point of view because maybe he did not want Miss Caroline to know that he was poor or to have other students make fun of him for that, including Scout. Scout once asked Atticus why the Cunningham's were poor and if the Finch's were as poor as they were, here is a quote "One morning Jem and I found a load of stovewood in the back yard. Later, a sack of hickory nuts appeared on the back steps. With Christmas came a crate of smilax and holly. That spring when we found a crokersack full of turnip greens, Atticus said Mr. Cunningham had more than paid him. 'Why does he pay you like that?' I asked. 'Because that's the only way he can pay me. He has no money.' 'Are we poor, Atticus?' Atticus nodded. 'We are indeed.' Jem's nose wrinkled. 'Are we as poor as the Cunningham's?' 'Not exactly. The Cunningham's are country folks, farmers, and the crash hit them the hardest."[pg 20-21] Scout never made fun of him again because when Jem invited him over for dinner and she saw him pour syrup on the pile of food on his plate and she kept saying that he kept drowning in his food and Calpurinia told her off by telling Scout that there are some folks who don't eats the way the Finch's do. Scout finally realized that everyone is poor in Maycomb because of the economy since the Great Depression was happening during this time period and they too were poor, but as poor as the Cunningham's and she realized that she took everything for granted and did not realize how awful the Cunningham's lived compared to her, she never made fun of Walter ever again.

In "To Kill a Mockingbird", Jeremy Finch, or Jem, had a coming of age lesson when he realized you should not intrude in other people's house's or owned land. This is a lesson because when Jem and Dill had the idea of sneaking into the Radley's yard and to look through the window to try see if they can get a look of what boo Radley looked liked, they believed that this would be a good idea since no one would see them and no one would find out. But in the end, they were seen by a man with a hat, Mr. Nathan Radley, who came from the Radley house when Jeam was on the porch. When Jem, Scout, and Dill went into the Radley yard, there was a porch that ran across the width of the house, two doors and two dark windows. When Dill coudn't see anything in the window he looked through, Jem tried to look through one of the windows on the porch, but since the porch was so squeaky, it woke up the man with the hat, but all Scout saw was a shadow. Jem ran and told Dill and Scout to run with him through the schoolyard fence, and while running, they heard a shotgun that roared through the neighborhood. But when Scout and Dill went through the fence fine, they saw Jem having trouble getting through and he was trying to wiggle through but his pants were stuck on the fence. Jem finally got through the fence but the problem was that his pants were still tangled in the fence, leaving him pant less. When the three of them went through Deer Pasture, they saw all of the neighbors circle around the Radley's gate and with Mr. Nathan Radley inside his gate with the shotgun in his hand. Jem, Scout and Dill went over to the crowd and pretended to not know what was going on and Jem aked Miss Maudie what happened, forgetting he did not have his pants. "'What happened?' Jem asked. 'Mr. Radley shot at a Negro in his collard patch.' 'Oh. Did he hit him?' 'No,' said Miss Stephanie. 'Shot in the air. Scared him pale, though. Says if anybody sees a white nigger around, that's the one. Says he's got the other barrel waitn' for the next sound he hears in that patch, an' next time he won't aim high, be it dog, nigger, or-Jem Finch!"'[pg 54] Miss Stephanie knew that it was Jem because he saw he did not have his pants since they were in the fence, but Dill told Atticus that that they were playing strip poker by the fishpool making an alibi for Jem, Scout and himself so they won't get in trouble. Atticus did believe in Dill and was still mad. But Jem still felt unsafe without his pants and went to retrieve them with Scout and he found them waiting for him, neatly folded and sewed where he ripped them in the gate. The lesson that Jem had learned from this is that not to sneak into someone's yard at night even if you expect no one to find you because in the end, someone is always watching and will get you in trouble. And Jem also learned not to lie because he felt very unsafe without his pants, but still relieved that he did not get in trouble for that but still he wanted to know if he could get rid of the evidence, when someone already found the evidence for him.


I agree with Jem's coming-of-age experience. When a child learns not to trespass, they are learning a valuable lesson that will keep them out of trouble. Jem learned this lesson when he snuck into the Radley's yard and lost his pants. Without this lesson, he would continue to trespass, possibly putting himself into danger, or getting into a large amount of trouble. Jem also learned not to lie. He felt guilty and scared after lying. When a child learns not to lie, it helps them become more mature and more trustworthy. Due to this, your coming-of-age example was accurate.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/7/12 7:22 PM as a reply to Emory Bowen.
I agree with this about Scout and Jem because without taking responsibility or learning to control their anger then they would not have been able to grow up and mature. Scout definitely has learned a lot from her father, Atticus, because he teaches her by speaking to her as an equal, which shows Scout she is grown up and should behave like him. As for Jem he is also treated as an equal and while he grew up he always wanted to impress his father and never let him down, this also taught him to be "older." Both kids learned how to behave because of their father, he was the cause for their "coming age."

Emory Bowen:
Scout learns the lesson that you cant fight someone just because they said something insulting. At the begining of the book she hits Francis because of what he calls her father. After talks with her father she realizes that fighting isnt going to help her. This is her "coming of age". She grows more mature about dealing with people talking about her father. At school she was teased about it and had to think back at what her father had told her. "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner i learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be." (pg. 74). You can tell that she is becoming more mature because she remembers what her father tells her. She takes a moment to think about what she is about to do. Later on in the book, When Scout and Jem are walking to the store, Mrs. Dubose calls their father the same thing Francis had. Scout resists going over and hitting her. This is when you can tell she is really "coming of age.".


Jem learned alot about controling his anger too. When he couldnt handle Mrs. Dubose's comment about his father, Jem ruins her garden. Responsibility is an important thing to learn as you grow older. It has alot to do with "coming of age" because you have to be responsible when your older. Jems father tells him to go appologize to mrs. Dubose and so he does. "She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and read to her out loud for two hours."(pg 105). Jem didnt want to do this but he followed through because that was his consequence. This showed how Jem was becoming more mature.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/7/12 8:13 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout is a young girl who was always raised as one of the guys. She grew up different and not as a regular girl would, but i feel like this taught her many more things than any other girl would've learned. One lesson Scout learns is pride. In many cases throughout the book Scout learned and demonstrated pride. One example is when she speaks with her father and Calpurnia about Walter Cunningham. In the beginning of the story she sees Walter as a poor boy with no potential and that he was a waste of time. Soon after she begins school for her first year she beats up Walter thinking no one would care. Scout grew up fighting because she grew up hanging out with her brother and Dill. While hurting Walter, Jem comes over and makes her stop and invites Walter to dinner. At dinner Atticus begins talking to Walter as if he was an adult. When this started i think it began to show Scout how everyone is human and even if they may not have that much money, people are equal. Cal says to her, "Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty!" (p.24) This was the first talk which started to teach Scout about a person's pride and how money doesn't have a lot to do with it, but instead manners and confidence. As the book progresses she begins learning more and more about pride. Another example is when she is at Uncle Jack's for Christmas and Francis is making fun of her father so she beats him up. Uncle Jack decides to teach her lesson for fighting when he didn't know the whole story, he whips her. Scout thought about running, but decided against it. Not only that, but when she has the opportunity to get Francis in trouble she says no so she can have her pride in her father's eyes.

Jem also learned lessons about Pride. Jem grew up being a good boy who never once got whipped by his father. This was Jem's version of pride; He always wanted to show his dad that he was just like him and was proud. Jem says, "I – it's like this, Scout," he muttered. "Atticus ain't ever whipped me since I can remember. I wanta keep it that way."(p.56) Through this quote it is seen how much Jem will do to stay good in his father's eyes, including going back to the Radley's house. In this time period it was all about image, especially to Jem who wanted to grow up and be Atticus. He plans to be a lawyer at this point in the book because of Atticus. Jem loses his pride at parts in the book including when he ruined Mrs. Dubose's camellia bushes and had to earn his pride back by reading to her, showing her that he would pay the time for the crime he had committed. So, both kids have learned a lot about pride throughout the story and even though they lost it at times, they would always win it back.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/7/12 10:37 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
In chapter 11 Scout was able to finally realize why Atticus was telling her and Jem to get a hold of their anger, especially when they heard someone talking about Atticus in a negative way for defending Tom Robinson. Mrs. Dubose was always calling insults to Jem and Scout as they passed by her house every day, one day she shouted an insult about Atticus that deeply offended Jem however Scout and Jem eventually continued to walk to town and bought a toy steam engine and a baton. However on as they passed Mrs. Dubose's house Jem grabbed Scout's baton and destroyed all of Mrs. Dubose's camellia bushes, he then pulled Scouts hair when she wouldn't stop screeching and then kicked her which caused her to fall to the ground. It is implied in the book that Scout was able to get a better understanding of why Atticus was telling her and Jem to not start any fights, she was able to see how immature that Jem was by acting the way he did to Mrs. Dubose and herself. I believe that this incident will make Scout think twice about starting a fight with anyone, she might still fight the person because of her pride but she might realize that what she did was immature and she could have delt with the situation in a better way.

In chapter 10 both Scout and Jem found out that their father use to shoot and was very good at it, in fact his nickname was OL' One shot when he was younger. Atticus never mentioned to them that he use to ever do such a thing and in fact was not big on the idea of the two of them shooting air rifles. At the end of the chapter, Jem picks up a rock and through it at a carhouse, he then chased after it and called back to Scout that "Atticus is a gentleman, just like me!" Jem learned through Atticus's example that some things in life must be given up, or mainly left unsaid in order to make yourself a better person. This might make Jem consider about his behavior and interests in life and what he should be doing to make himself a better person.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/7/12 11:53 PM as a reply to kylie isabelle verrengia.
kylie isabelle verrengia:
Scout is a young girl who was always raised as one of the guys. She grew up different and not as a regular girl would, but i feel like this taught her many more things than any other girl would've learned. One lesson Scout learns is pride. In many cases throughout the book Scout learned and demonstrated pride. One example is when she speaks with her father and Calpurnia about Walter Cunningham. In the beginning of the story she sees Walter as a poor boy with no potential and that he was a waste of time. Soon after she begins school for her first year she beats up Walter thinking no one would care. Scout grew up fighting because she grew up hanging out with her brother and Dill. While hurting Walter, Jem comes over and makes her stop and invites Walter to dinner. At dinner Atticus begins talking to Walter as if he was an adult. When this started i think it began to show Scout how everyone is human and even if they may not have that much money, people are equal. Cal says to her, "Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty!" (p.24) This was the first talk which started to teach Scout about a person's pride and how money doesn't have a lot to do with it, but instead manners and confidence. As the book progresses she begins learning more and more about pride. Another example is when she is at Uncle Jack's for Christmas and Francis is making fun of her father so she beats him up. Uncle Jack decides to teach her lesson for fighting when he didn't know the whole story, he whips her. Scout thought about running, but decided against it. Not only that, but when she has the opportunity to get Francis in trouble she says no so she can have her pride in her father's eyes.

Jem also learned lessons about Pride. Jem grew up being a good boy who never once got whipped by his father. This was Jem's version of pride; He always wanted to show his dad that he was just like him and was proud. Jem says, "I – it's like this, Scout," he muttered. "Atticus ain't ever whipped me since I can remember. I wanta keep it that way."(p.56) Through this quote it is seen how much Jem will do to stay good in his father's eyes, including going back to the Radley's house. In this time period it was all about image, especially to Jem who wanted to grow up and be Atticus. He plans to be a lawyer at this point in the book because of Atticus. Jem loses his pride at parts in the book including when he ruined Mrs. Dubose's camellia bushes and had to earn his pride back by reading to her, showing her that he would pay the time for the crime he had committed. So, both kids have learned a lot about pride throughout the story and even though they lost it at times, they would always win it back.



While I agree with you that lessons in pride (in order to show self respect) are important, I believe it should be known that pride is a double-edged sword. While one definition could be 'self-respect', another is 'conceit', as in the word 'conceited.' Psychologically, the basis upon which pride is built is unwillngness to change, to cling to past victories. In an era (as well as the points given in 'To Kill a Mockingbird') pride has caused widewpread racism and stereotypiing of African-Americans, due to it's roots in maintaining the status quo. As I said before, Pride isn't necessarily a bad thing to possess, but too much of a good thing id bad for anyone.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 12:33 AM as a reply to James Hayden.
James Hayden:
Both the characters of Jem and Scout learn many a lesson in (what one could call) "Act 1" of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird"

The protagonist, Jean Louise "Scout" Finch learns a good deal about life in the first part of this story. On her first day of school, Scout gets into trouble with her teacher, Miss Caroline, due to the fact that Scout is already literate, eliminating a majority of Miss Caroline's job of teaching the six-year-old. She, in turn, goes to her father for advice on the matter, not wanting to stop reading all together as instructed by her teacher. Upon hearing Scout's unfair and biased judging of Miss Caroline, Atticus gives Scout this piece of advice which she shows to take to heart in later chapters: "You'll never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb in his skin and walk around in it."(Pg 30). This is what one could consider a classic take on the proverb: "Don't judge a person until you walk a mile in their shoes.", meaning that if you truly do not know what a person's life is/has been like, you hold no right to judge them for their actions. Perhaps this will affect her opinion regarding the upcoming trial? There is no other way to find out but to read on.
.
Also, the (what one may call the deautagonist) brother of Scout, Jeremy Atticus "Jem" Finch has learned many lessons in his escapades throughout this novel by Harper Lee. Jem could be described as a boy trying to be a man. He tries to act tough, going out of his way to prove his masculinity to others, even going to touch the infamous Radley house in a dare from Dill, showing how he defines courage through childish and possible dangerous acts. However, later in the book, he is taught be Atticus what true courage is, that being to stand up to adversity despite how hard it is. This is shown when Atticus forces Jem to go to the house of Mrs. Dubose and read to her as payment for crushing the woman's flowers. After Mrs. Dubose dies, Atticus explains his reasoning to Jem: ""I wanted you to see something about her-I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do." (Page 112) Perhaps this lesson in courage will cause Jem to make more mature decisions in the future, regarding himself,his sister, his family, and all of those around him.



I agree with you with the lesson that Scout has learned on her first day of school, it allows her to understand why people act the way they do based on what has happened to them. Everyone learns this lesson at one point in their life, Scout has learned it earlier than most, and I think that this will come in handy when the trials happen because she will wonder why is it that the whites hate the blacks so much when they have done nothing wrong and this will allow her to be a better person than most in her community. I also agree with the lesson that Jem has learned, I agree with you that Jem has learned through Atticus what courage really is not only from what he said but also for being Tom Robinson’s lawyer. Another thing that I believe that Atticus does that demonstrates courage is by shooting Tim Johnson, but not because he was facing a rabid dog, but because he had to do something he didn’t want to do and gave up in his life to be a better person, shooting. I believe that you are right that this will make him make more mature decisions in life, but I think that it will also help him face the criticism that will be placed upon his father in the coming trials.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 7:59 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Jem has a coming of age lesson when Calpurnia, Scout and him are talking about how most of the people at First Purchase are illierate. Before this conversation, Jem believes that everyone can read and write and that everyone gets the same education. This conversation with Calpurnia shows Jem that not all people get the same things and that not everyone is able to get the same things, especially during the great depression. The point where Jem really learns this is page 125, "Maybe because they can't read. Cal, did you teach Zeebo?' 'Yeah, Mister Jem. there wasn't a school even when he was a boy. I made him learn though." I believe this is the point that Jem has a coming of age moment, realizing that not all people get the same things and that not everyone gets educated. By the end of the story i think this lesson may be very important to Jem. When Jem is a little more grown up and starts getting involved in whats going on in the outside world, it will be good for him to know that not everyone is treated equal.

Scout has a coming of age lesson when Uncle Jack hits her for chasing after, insulting and hitting Francis. Before this incident, Scout believes that all of her problems can be solved by fighting. She thinks that if someone provokes her, she can come out swinging and that will make everything better. When she punches Francis in the face and Uncle Jack and the rest of the family comes out she starts to see the error in her ways. Uncle Jack hitting her is the next step to her finally learning that bad choices lead to bad consequences. The real point where she has a coming-of-age lesson is when she is talking to Uncle Jack and she realizes Francis is going to have to go through what she went through, "... I knew Francis was in for it. " I've got a good mind to go out there tonight.' 'Please sir, just let it go. Please." (86) At this point Scout realizes that her wrong doing is going to cost Francis as well as her and that unless she wants people to hate her, she should stop fighting so much.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 8:10 PM as a reply to James Hayden.
James Hayden:
Both the characters of Jem and Scout learn many a lesson in (what one could call) "Act 1" of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird"

The protagonist, Jean Louise "Scout" Finch learns a good deal about life in the first part of this story. On her first day of school, Scout gets into trouble with her teacher, Miss Caroline, due to the fact that Scout is already literate, eliminating a majority of Miss Caroline's job of teaching the six-year-old. She, in turn, goes to her father for advice on the matter, not wanting to stop reading all together as instructed by her teacher. Upon hearing Scout's unfair and biased judging of Miss Caroline, Atticus gives Scout this piece of advice which she shows to take to heart in later chapters: "You'll never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb in his skin and walk around in it."(Pg 30). This is what one could consider a classic take on the proverb: "Don't judge a person until you walk a mile in their shoes.", meaning that if you truly do not know what a person's life is/has been like, you hold no right to judge them for their actions. Perhaps this will affect her opinion regarding the upcoming trial? There is no other way to find out but to read on.
.
Also, the (what one may call the deautagonist) brother of Scout, Jeremy Atticus "Jem" Finch has learned many lessons in his escapades throughout this novel by Harper Lee. Jem could be described as a boy trying to be a man. He tries to act tough, going out of his way to prove his masculinity to others, even going to touch the infamous Radley house in a dare from Dill, showing how he defines courage through childish and possible dangerous acts. However, later in the book, he is taught be Atticus what true courage is, that being to stand up to adversity despite how hard it is. This is shown when Atticus forces Jem to go to the house of Mrs. Dubose and read to her as payment for crushing the woman's flowers. After Mrs. Dubose dies, Atticus explains his reasoning to Jem: ""I wanted you to see something about her-I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do." (Page 112) Perhaps this lesson in courage will cause Jem to make more mature decisions in the future, regarding himself,his sister, his family, and all of those around him.



I agree that both of these lessons are important coming-of-age lessons for Scout and Jem. I never really thought about Scout taking that lesson to heart and possibly bringing it up in the trial. Scout's very biased outlook on Miss Caroline will most likely be brought up later in the story, proving it to be an important part. I think Scout learned a great deal from Atticus in this situation and i think it would have been useful for her to remember this during the situation with Uncle Jack when she says right away that she will hate him forever. Scout has no idea that Jack isnt very experienced in dealing with children and she jumps to conclusions too quickly just like in the example you showed. As for Jem, i agree that he needs to know what real courage is and that it isnt just puting oneself in a dangerous position even though it is not necessary. Jem learns a lot from this experience and i fully agree that it was a coming-of-age experience for someone caught between being a child and a young adult.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 8:38 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout has learned that you shouldn't judge people just by what they seem like. For instance, Scout complained to Miss Maudie about how everybody else's parents play poker and hunt together, but her father Atticus just simply reads at home. Scout said that Atticus can't do anything because she hasn't seen Atticus do anything besides read. Atticus then kills the mad dog on the first shot, and Scout and Jem sees this and are impressed. Miss Maudie then says to Atticus, "I saw that One-Shot Finch!" Miss Maudie also told Scout and Jem that Atticus had other talents. For instance on page 91, it says " Well, did you know he's the best checker-player in this town?" I think that Scout will remember this lesson later on in the story and know that there's more to people than what meets the eye because of seeing how many things Atticus could do.

Jem has learned that if you do the wrong thing that there are consequences. I think this because Jem had to go get his pants back after trying to get a look at Boo Radley. Boo Radley's brother said that he'd shoot anybody who he saw on his lawn again, but Jem had to get his pants back or he'd get in lots of trouble with Atticus if Atticus found out they weren't playing strip poker and that Jem had lied to him. On page 56, right after Jem tells Scout he has to go get his pants, and Scout asking why, Jem says, "We shouldn'a done that tonight, Scout." This quote proves that Jem learns that there are consequences because he's telling Scout how what they did was wrong and how they shouldn't of done it in the first place. I think that in the future Jem will do that right thing because he doesn't want Atticus to think low of him.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 8:42 PM as a reply to Emory Bowen.
Emory Bowen:
Scout learns the lesson that you cant fight someone just because they said something insulting. At the begining of the book she hits Francis because of what he calls her father. After talks with her father she realizes that fighting isnt going to help her. This is her "coming of age". She grows more mature about dealing with people talking about her father. At school she was teased about it and had to think back at what her father had told her. "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner i learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be." (pg. 74). You can tell that she is becoming more mature because she remembers what her father tells her. She takes a moment to think about what she is about to do. Later on in the book, When Scout and Jem are walking to the store, Mrs. Dubose calls their father the same thing Francis had. Scout resists going over and hitting her. This is when you can tell she is really "coming of age.".


Jem learned alot about controling his anger too. When he couldnt handle Mrs. Dubose's comment about his father, Jem ruins her garden. Responsibility is an important thing to learn as you grow older. It has alot to do with "coming of age" because you have to be responsible when your older. Jems father tells him to go appologize to mrs. Dubose and so he does. "She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and read to her out loud for two hours."(pg 105). Jem didnt want to do this but he followed through because that was his consequence. This showed how Jem was becoming more mature.




I agree with you that Scout learned not to fight people just because they insulted you because Scout didn't hit Mrs. Dubose so Scout learned her lesson after her incident with Francais. Although, I don't agree with you that Jem learned about controlling his anger at all, because after Jem ripped apart Mrs. Dubose's flowers he still yelled at her and Atticus for having to read to Mrs. Dubose for an extra week.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 10:46 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
In "To Kill A Mockingbird" thus far Scout has learned many lessons. I think the most important lesson she learned was to not lash out in violence when she heard something she didn't like. Scout is not like most girls; she speaks her mind and can defend herself with no trouble at all. Being so young and mainly being raised by males, Scout has trouble expressing her emotions with words and she prefers her fists instead. "You can just take that back, boy! [...] My fists were clenched and I was ready to let fly. Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting anymore; I was far too old and too big for childish thing, and the sooner I learned to hold in, the better off everyone would be. I soon forgot" (Page 74). But what it really comes down to is the stage that she is at in her life. She is at the age where she feels like nobody will listen to her and she needs to prove her worth with the boy by usingviolence. I think that Scout just wants to get her point across, but she doesn't know how to. She wants to be like Jem, her older brother, because she looks up to him as a role model. I think the lesson that Scout learned was to try expression her feeling and emotions in words instead of violence, because people will be much more willing to listen. I think it may take some time for Scout to fully understand why Atticus doesn't want her fighting because after all, she is still very young. I think the lesson Scout learned will effect her through out the novel in many ways. But I think the biggest way it will help her, is when people make snotty remarks about Atticus defending a black man in the case, she wouldn't pounce on them and try to get them to see that their thinking in wrong by using meaningless violence. I think if Scout "turns her cheek" and just ignors it, she won't be giving the people the satisfaction they are looking for. All in all I feel like Scout can benefit greatly from the lesson she learned because it will not only help her but possibly Atticus and Jem as well.


In "To Kill A Mockingbird" thus far Jem has learned many lessons too. I think the most important lesson he learned was within himself. I think Jem struggled to find himself. He always felt like he needed to be a big, tough man when in reality he was only twelve. It seemed like half of him wanted to just run around, have fun, and be a kid; while the other half of him felt like he needed to always put on a brave face and that he was too old to be playing with his little sister. "Jem was twelve. He wa difficult to live with, inconsistent, moody. His appetite was appalling, and he told me so many times to stop pestering him" (Page 115). I think that Jem was at that age in life where once he started acting brave, it was hard for him to go back and be a child again. I think the lesson Jem learned was that it is okay to still be a boy and to have fun, but he can also be responsible and brave all at the same time. I think this lesson will help Jem throughout the novel because Scout and him are going to get in some pretty sticky situations. So by using his imagination and being brave he will be able to out-think anyone who trys to hurt him or his family. I also think that because Jem is so mature for his age, he will be able to see what really goes on in Maycomb County and his veiwpoint on things will be changed dramatically. To sum things up, I think the Jem found a way to still be a boy and have fun, but he also found a way to be a brave man and protect his family.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 10:54 PM as a reply to Emory Bowen.
Emory Bowen:
Scout learns the lesson that you cant fight someone just because they said something insulting. At the begining of the book she hits Francis because of what he calls her father. After talks with her father she realizes that fighting isnt going to help her. This is her "coming of age". She grows more mature about dealing with people talking about her father. At school she was teased about it and had to think back at what her father had told her. "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner i learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be." (pg. 74). You can tell that she is becoming more mature because she remembers what her father tells her. She takes a moment to think about what she is about to do. Later on in the book, When Scout and Jem are walking to the store, Mrs. Dubose calls their father the same thing Francis had. Scout resists going over and hitting her. This is when you can tell she is really "coming of age.".


Jem learned alot about controling his anger too. When he couldnt handle Mrs. Dubose's comment about his father, Jem ruins her garden. Responsibility is an important thing to learn as you grow older. It has alot to do with "coming of age" because you have to be responsible when your older. Jems father tells him to go appologize to mrs. Dubose and so he does. "She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and read to her out loud for two hours."(pg 105). Jem didnt want to do this but he followed through because that was his consequence. This showed how Jem was becoming more mature.


I also agree with Emory, it seems like both Jem and Scout had issues controlling their built up anger. I think that because of the time period they lived in, violence was pretty common. I think that since Jem and Scout's father, Atticus, was defending a black man in the case, they took it personally when someone said or made rude comments about their father or his client. It almost seemed like when someone would say something mean, they felt as if they could "one-up-them" by using violence. Although Jem and Scout did have some anger issues, they seemed to be able to correct their problem, which is better for not only themselves but everyone around them as well. I also think the lessons they learned have taught them a thing or two about respect for blacks and whites.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 10:59 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
A coming of age experience that Scout had was in chapter nine. All before the incident with Francis, Scout had taken all her anger out on people by beating them up. Because Scout was so young, she thought that the only way to let out her feelings was to do it physically, which was what she was told not to do. When Scout did this, Atticus had told her to hold in the anger and not fight anyone, because fighting wasn't right, but the time with Francis she believed was different. "Francis looked at me carefully, concluded that I had been sufficiently subdued, and crooned softly, "Nigger-lover..." This time, i split my knuckle to the bone on his front teeth. My left impaired, I sailed in with my right, but not for long. Uncle Jack pinned my arms to my sides and said, "Stand still!"" (Lee 84). After this happened, Scout did not think what she had done was wrong at all. She believed that because she stood up for Atticus, it was okay. But Uncle Jack, Atticus, and the rest of the family was not pleased at all. But later when Uncle Jack and Atticus were speaking was really when Scout had a coming of age lesson. On page 88, Atticus was talking to Uncle Jack about the incident and how he feels it has affected Scout and Jem. "Right. But do you think I could face my children otherwise? You know what's going to happen as well as I do, Jack, and I hope and pray I can get Jem and Scout through it without bitterness, and most of all, without catching Maycomb's usual disease. Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don't pretend to understand... I just hope that Jem and Scout come to me for their answers instead of listening to the town. I hope they trust me enough... Jean Louise?" After Atticus says this, we learn later in the chapter that he actually meant for Scout to hear this. That was Atticus' way to say he doesn't want Scout to be affected at all by what people like Francis may say about him. He wants Scout to keep her head up and never drop to someone's level and fight them, when that is probably what they want her to do. From getting in a fight with Francis to hearing Atticus talk to Jack, Scout had a coming of age lesson that as she gets older, people will say things that will get her upset, but as long as she stays close with her family, it shouldn't change any of her feelings about the people she loves. I predict that throughout the rest of the novel, if anyone says things to Scout that get her angry, she will remember what Atticus said and she will try to keep herself from fighting.

A coming of age experience that Jem had was in chapter 11 when Jem also got in trouble for not being able to hold in his anger. It was when him and Scout were walking home when they saw Mrs. Dubose. She began say mean things about their family, but Scout said it was "routine" and nothing they hadn't heard from her before. But this time was different. Mrs. Dubose said very cruel things about Atticus that obviously hit Jem hard. She said, "Yes indeed, what has this world come to when a Finch does against his raising? I'll tell you!" Then she added, "Your father's no better than the nigeers and trash he works for!" Scout, also mad but remembering that the kids must not yell or fight, especially with an elderly woman, told Jem to just walk away, which they did. But the next day when they walked by her house again, Jem took Scout's baton and destroyed all of Mrs. Dubose's flowers. He then got caught and his punishment was to read to Mrs. Dubose every school day and Saturday for two hours for a month. The days had gone by and Jem seemed to read for her more and more every day. Until one day Atticus had called Jem over and told him Mrs. Dubose had died. Jem couldn't believe it. All in all his lesson after this was that Mrs. Dubose was suffering every day he was with her, and the days he walked by her after school. He had to realize no matter what the circumstance, he also has to hold in his anger because he never knows what the other person could be going through. I predict that through the story, Jem will continue to be more respectful to the adults and neighbors he knows because after Mrs. Dubose's death, he felt horrible for being so mean to her and ruining her flowers, which he knew meant so much to her.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 11:12 PM as a reply to Joseph Pilver.
Joseph Pilver:
Jem has a coming of age lesson when Calpurnia, Scout and him are talking about how most of the people at First Purchase are illierate. Before this conversation, Jem believes that everyone can read and write and that everyone gets the same education. This conversation with Calpurnia shows Jem that not all people get the same things and that not everyone is able to get the same things, especially during the great depression. The point where Jem really learns this is page 125, "Maybe because they can't read. Cal, did you teach Zeebo?' 'Yeah, Mister Jem. there wasn't a school even when he was a boy. I made him learn though." I believe this is the point that Jem has a coming of age moment, realizing that not all people get the same things and that not everyone gets educated. By the end of the story i think this lesson may be very important to Jem. When Jem is a little more grown up and starts getting involved in whats going on in the outside world, it will be good for him to know that not everyone is treated equal.

Scout has a coming of age lesson when Uncle Jack hits her for chasing after, insulting and hitting Francis. Before this incident, Scout believes that all of her problems can be solved by fighting. She thinks that if someone provokes her, she can come out swinging and that will make everything better. When she punches Francis in the face and Uncle Jack and the rest of the family comes out she starts to see the error in her ways. Uncle Jack hitting her is the next step to her finally learning that bad choices lead to bad consequences. The real point where she has a coming-of-age lesson is when she is talking to Uncle Jack and she realizes Francis is going to have to go through what she went through, "... I knew Francis was in for it. " I've got a good mind to go out there tonight.' 'Please sir, just let it go. Please." (86) At this point Scout realizes that her wrong doing is going to cost Francis as well as her and that unless she wants people to hate her, she should stop fighting so much.


I do agree that Jem had a coming of age when he realized not everyone could read or write. But I do think Jem realized that not everyone is treated equally. Jem knows what people say about Atticus defending an African American and he realizes that many white people do not treat them with equally, instead, they are racist and cruel to the African Americans and anyone who respects them. Also, as a agree with Scout having a coming of age realizing that fighting is not always the answer, I don't believe her knowing that Francis will also have a consequence really teaches her a coming of age lesson. After the fight I believe Scout thought it wasn't so bad to hit Francis because he was the one who made the comments first, but that doesn't truly teach her a lesson. Because really, Scout didn't learn the lesson until she heard what Atticus' opinion about it was, when Atticus was talking to Uncle Jack.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 11:43 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout's coming of age lesson is about her fighting. In the beginning and throughout the chapters we have read, she would always resort to fighting, mainly because of what was happing in her life; her father supporting a black man in a trial, and when she had troubles with Francis, her cousin. Francis didnt like her because her dad was supporting a black man, even her aunt said that it would ruin the whole family and make them look bad. After Francis said that, she punched him in the face because she wasnt taught any other way to handle it. She started to realize that she should find other ways to deal with certain situations that make her upset and angry because it just makes her look bad when she resorts to fighting every time. "Atticus had promised he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big fir such childish things" (Pg. 74).She knew that better than getting in a fight and then having her dad find out and her getting in trouble, it'd be better if she just found different ways to handle things, it would be better off in the future for her, and also not be known or get a reputaion as a fighter. Also every time her and Jem walked by Mrs. Dubose's house she would be sitting outside and she would say negative comments about Atticus and how he was defending a black man. They both came to a relization that fighting would get them in bigger trouble and they should just walk by with their heads held high and ignore it, that was the better solution and once they learned how to do that, things would change.



Jem's coming of age lesson was when he learned what real courage is. Jem is the kind of boy that does stuff, sometimes stupid stuff to get people's attention and get them interested in him. He tries to act tough, perfect, like he's infinsable and no one can affect him. I think that sometimes he's thinks hes so tough that he get's cocky. An example would be when he and Scout went to the Radley place and his pants got stuck on the fence. He thought he was so cool and all tough because he went in their yard and everyone is terrified of that house. When Jem and Scout have to go to Mrs. Dubose's house and read to her every week, he learns what real courage is. "[...] I wanted you to see something about her- I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand." ( Reffering to Atticus' nick-name Ol' One shot) "It's when you know you're licked before you begin what you begin anyway and you see through it no matter what" (Pg. 112). After that both Jem and Scout realized what courage really means.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 11:49 PM as a reply to Alyssa Hansen.
Alyssa Hansen:
In "To Kill A Mockingbird" thus far Scout has learned many lessons. I think the most important lesson she learned was to not lash out in violence when she heard something she didn't like. Scout is not like most girls; she speaks her mind and can defend herself with no trouble at all. Being so young and mainly being raised by males, Scout has trouble expressing her emotions with words and she prefers her fists instead. "You can just take that back, boy! [...] My fists were clenched and I was ready to let fly. Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting anymore; I was far too old and too big for childish thing, and the sooner I learned to hold in, the better off everyone would be. I soon forgot" (Page 74). But what it really comes down to is the stage that she is at in her life. She is at the age where she feels like nobody will listen to her and she needs to prove her worth with the boy by usingviolence. I think that Scout just wants to get her point across, but she doesn't know how to. She wants to be like Jem, her older brother, because she looks up to him as a role model. I think the lesson that Scout learned was to try expression her feeling and emotions in words instead of violence, because people will be much more willing to listen. I think it may take some time for Scout to fully understand why Atticus doesn't want her fighting because after all, she is still very young. I think the lesson Scout learned will effect her through out the novel in many ways. But I think the biggest way it will help her, is when people make snotty remarks about Atticus defending a black man in the case, she wouldn't pounce on them and try to get them to see that their thinking in wrong by using meaningless violence. I think if Scout "turns her cheek" and just ignors it, she won't be giving the people the satisfaction they are looking for. All in all I feel like Scout can benefit greatly from the lesson she learned because it will not only help her but possibly Atticus and Jem as well.


In "To Kill A Mockingbird" thus far Jem has learned many lessons too. I think the most important lesson he learned was within himself. I think Jem struggled to find himself. He always felt like he needed to be a big, tough man when in reality he was only twelve. It seemed like half of him wanted to just run around, have fun, and be a kid; while the other half of him felt like he needed to always put on a brave face and that he was too old to be playing with his little sister. "Jem was twelve. He wa difficult to live with, inconsistent, moody. His appetite was appalling, and he told me so many times to stop pestering him" (Page 115). I think that Jem was at that age in life where once he started acting brave, it was hard for him to go back and be a child again. I think the lesson Jem learned was that it is okay to still be a boy and to have fun, but he can also be responsible and brave all at the same time. I think this lesson will help Jem throughout the novel because Scout and him are going to get in some pretty sticky situations. So by using his imagination and being brave he will be able to out-think anyone who trys to hurt him or his family. I also think that because Jem is so mature for his age, he will be able to see what really goes on in Maycomb County and his veiwpoint on things will be changed dramatically. To sum things up, I think the Jem found a way to still be a boy and have fun, but he also found a way to be a brave man and protect his family.


I agree completely with you on both topics, i think that Scout is struggling to be heard being the only girl in the family besides Calpurnia and spends her time hanging out with boys, and has begun acting like them. I think that it will take time for her to learn that she cant react with violence and that there are different ways to handle things in any situation. I think with Jem, he wanted to always show that he was rough and tough for his sister and that he ahd to protect her because Atticus wasnt always home and they were by themselves a lot in the neiborhood. I think that sometimes he does stuff that could get in trouble but to show his sister that he isnt afraid of anything. Overall i think both your responses were written well and answered the prompt well.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 11:49 PM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
In To kill a Mockingbird Scout learns a very important lesson when Atticus tells her that she cant fight at school no matter what they say to her for example " My fists were clenched and I was ready to let fly. Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far to old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to hold it in, the better off everybody would be." At this point in the story Cecil Jacobs is making fun of Atticus for being a N-Lover. Before the talk that Scout had with Atticus she would have pounded his face in but she decides that she has to grow up and be the bigger person and not fight back because she has to be brave and show that she does not care what people thought about her family and the decisions that they make.
Jem also learns a very important lesson when he gets mad at Mrs. Dubose for saying " Your fathers no better than the niggers and trash he works for!" Jem gets so mad that he uses the batton he had just bought for Scout to destroy her plants. He then gets in huge trouble and is forced to read to
Mrs. Dubose for a mounth. Jem learns that he cant let his anger get the best of him because if this had been a different situation and he had taken his anger out on a person then he would have to suffer much harder consiquences than what he had to face for this.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/8/12 11:56 PM as a reply to Nicole Parenchuck.
Nicole Parenchuck:
An example of Scout coming-of-age is when Calpurnia angerly talks to Scout when Walter Cunningham is eating at their house. On page 24, Scout says," But he's gone and drowned his dinner in syrup." Calpurnia answered this by saying calling Scout to the kitchen and telling her that some people do not eat like her, and she should respect her company. On page 24, Calpurnia says,"There's some folks who don't eat like us, but you ain't called on to contradict 'em at the table when they don't. That boy's yo' comp'ny and if he wants to eat up the table cloth you let him, you hear?" Scout learns to respect everyone who comes to her house, by being polite and keeping rude thoughts to herself. This lesson will help Scout become more mature, and teach her to respect everyone.

An example of Jem coming-of-age is when Atticus teaches him about courage. On page 112, Atticus said,"I wanted you to see something about her- I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand." This helped Jem understand that sometimes small acts of kindness like reading to Mrs. Dubose, who was sick and frightening to the children, takes a large amount of courage. Jem learned the lesson to help those in need, and that you do not need to be a superhero to be courageous. I think this will cause Jem to act less childish, and to help more people in need.




I agree that Scout learns to be more mature by being told that she should respect how others do things and that they may not have a lifestyle as great as hers might be. Keeping her rude comments to herself will definitely be very important in terms of being able to understand other people who may not have the same opinions and values that she may possess.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:01 AM as a reply to Joseph Pilver.
I agree with what you said about Scout because at one point in most of our lives we all belive that fighting can solve all of our problems just like scout. Like Scout we also realize that we often just get in more trouble for fighting. For example if someone calls you a mean name and you punch him in the face than you will get suspended and the kid you punched will have nothing done to him. Scout also learns this lesson when she gets in trouble for fighting with Francis. I think this is one of the most important lessons to learn in life.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:04 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout learns the lesson that you can't take to violence because you don't like someone or something that someone is doing. When we are first introduced to her cousin, Francis Hancock, in chapter nine, Scout makes it very clear that she does not like Francis. Further into the chapter while she is talking to him, he says, "He's nothin' but a nigger-lover!" (Page 83) about Atticus, and this triggers Scout to leap onto Francis even after she had promised Atticus that she would not continue to fight. This type of action usually occurs with younger kids, and even though Scout is still on the younger side, she learns later that this is no way to react to negative events. This "coming-of-age" lesson sort of fades in and out of Scout, though. Prior to her fight with Francis, she is teased at school by a boy named Cecil Jacobs. He comes up to her in the schoolyard, the day following Scout's promise to Atticus to refrain from fighting when someone teases her about her father, and says," My folks said your daddy was a disgrace an' that nigger oughta hang from the water-tank! [...] Scout's a cow-ward!" (Page 76-77) which, although it aggravated her, she kept her promise to Atticus. It is made very clear that Scout understands that fighting is bad when she says, "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I held in, the better off everybody would be." This showed that she understood why Atticus was telling her this and that she will do what he says, even if she is antagonized like she is after the encounter with Cecil Jacobs.


Similar to the lesson that Scout learns, Jem has a bit of controlling that he has to control and maintain on his own. In chapter 11 Jem, along with Scout, walk home passing by Mrs. Dubose's house. As they are walking by, she says a few nasty things to them concluding with, "Not only a Finch waiting on tables but one in the courthouse lawing for niggers!" (Page 101), and " Your father's no better than the niggers and trash he works for!" (page 102), which hit Jem hard and set him off. They proceed to the store where he buys a baton for Scout and a steam train for himself, as planned. On their way back home, Jem stopped at Mrs. Dubose's gate, snatched the baton from Scout, and "ran flailing wildly up the steps to Mrs. Dubose's front yard" (Page 102). After doing so he "did not begin to calm down until he had cut the tops off every camellia bush Mrs. Dubose owned, until the ground was littered with green buds and leaves." (page 103). This instance depicts Jem's uncontrolled anger setting him off into a rampage, which led Atticus to send him to Mrs. Dubose for a punishment. His punishment is having to read to her for two hours every afternoon on school days and Saturdays. After this incident, Jem seems to be able to keep his cool which obviously shows that he has learned from this experience.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:19 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout had a "coming of age" experience when Aunt Alexandra came to stay in chapter 13. Aunt Alexandra is the type of lady who wants Scout to grow up 'lady-like' so when she visited she kept mentioning to scout to act like a lady. Her whole life Scout was insulted by Jem saying "I declare to the Lord you're gettin' more like a girl every day!" (Lee, 52). Aunt Alexandra just wanted Scout to grow up lady-like. Aunt Alexandra saw something in Scout no one else did, "[...] but you have a daughter to think of. A daughter whos growing up." (Lee, 137). So when Aunt Alexandra came over and showed Scout how to be a lady and told her it was okay to be a lady, Scout rejected the lady-like lessons. But i thnk later in the story Scout will become more lady-like than Aunt Alexandra herself.

emoticon emoticon

Jem experienced a "coming of age" event when ha had to read books to Mrs. Dubose as payback for destroying her camelia bushes. He had just bought Scout a new Baton with his own money and on their way back from the store he took her baton and swung at the heads of each of Mrs. Dubose's camelia bushes, "He did nnot begin to calm down untill he had cut the tops of every camellia bush [...] He bent my baton against his knee, snapped it in two and threw it down." (Lee, 103). He later confessed because Atticus forced him to and his punishment was to read to her every day for a month. This event tought him to take responsibility for his own actions and to follow through with punishments, even though the punishments are drudgery.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:28 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout indeed has learned many lessons in this story about coming of age. To me, the most important one is when she learns about how racism affects most of their town, and the most of the United states. She is first introduced to this when Atticus takes on the black man as his client. Atticus told scout that they most likely will not win the case and will be mocked around town for it. When scout asks him why he tells her, "Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us to try to win."(pg 76) The entire conversation that Atticus has with scout on pages 74-76 further enhance Scouts knowledge of african Americans and how they are viewed and treated in that designated time period. from this point on, after Atticus has shed light on the subject, scout will no longer refer to African Americans as n****rs and wil view them as any other human being.

Jem on the other hand learned many lessons himself through these chapters. one of the main ones though was personal space. Unfortunately, Jem learned his lesson the hard way, through the mistakes he made. With the radley house just down the street, Jem, Scout, and Dill were always snooping around it. With all the ghost stories gossiped around town about the mysterious Boo Radley, the children were intregued, just like any other child hearing a ghost story. Jem was even dared by Dill to touch the house which freightened all the children. Even after that incedent though, Jem was still questioning the existance of Boo so he decided to attempt to contact the mysterious stranger. He, scout and Dill wrote Boo a note asking him to come outside so they could hangout and buy him an icecream. Jem tried casting it into the window with his fishing pole when theyr father Atticus stepped in on them. Atticus said, "Son, I'm going to tell you something and tell you one time: stop tormenting that man. That goes for the other two of you." (pg. 49) Jem, from that moment on no longer messed around with the Radley house again, partly because of his fear of Atticus and partly for the respect that he felt for him. In the next few chapters, I predict that Jem will no longer disturb the Radleys and further respect them for who they are.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:35 AM as a reply to Samantha Briscoe.
Samantha Briscoe:
Scout learns the lesson that you can't take to violence because you don't like someone or something that someone is doing. When we are first introduced to her cousin, Francis Hancock, in chapter nine, Scout makes it very clear that she does not like Francis. Further into the chapter while she is talking to him, he says, "He's nothin' but a nigger-lover!" (Page 83) about Atticus, and this triggers Scout to leap onto Francis even after she had promised Atticus that she would not continue to fight. This type of action usually occurs with younger kids, and even though Scout is still on the younger side, she learns later that this is no way to react to negative events. This "coming-of-age" lesson sort of fades in and out of Scout, though. Prior to her fight with Francis, she is teased at school by a boy named Cecil Jacobs. He comes up to her in the schoolyard, the day following Scout's promise to Atticus to refrain from fighting when someone teases her about her father, and says," My folks said your daddy was a disgrace an' that nigger oughta hang from the water-tank! [...] Scout's a cow-ward!" (Page 76-77) which, although it aggravated her, she kept her promise to Atticus. It is made very clear that Scout understands that fighting is bad when she says, "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I held in, the better off everybody would be." This showed that she understood why Atticus was telling her this and that she will do what he says, even if she is antagonized like she is after the encounter with Cecil Jacobs.


Similar to the lesson that Scout learns, Jem has a bit of controlling that he has to control and maintain on his own. In chapter 11 Jem, along with Scout, walk home passing by Mrs. Dubose's house. As they are walking by, she says a few nasty things to them concluding with, "Not only a Finch waiting on tables but one in the courthouse lawing for niggers!" (Page 101), and " Your father's no better than the niggers and trash he works for!" (page 102), which hit Jem hard and set him off. They proceed to the store where he buys a baton for Scout and a steam train for himself, as planned. On their way back home, Jem stopped at Mrs. Dubose's gate, snatched the baton from Scout, and "ran flailing wildly up the steps to Mrs. Dubose's front yard" (Page 102). After doing so he "did not begin to calm down until he had cut the tops off every camellia bush Mrs. Dubose owned, until the ground was littered with green buds and leaves." (page 103). This instance depicts Jem's uncontrolled anger setting him off into a rampage, which led Atticus to send him to Mrs. Dubose for a punishment. His punishment is having to read to her for two hours every afternoon on school days and Saturdays. After this incident, Jem seems to be able to keep his cool which obviously shows that he has learned from this experience.


The "coming of age" experiences in mom's paragraphs are good reasons because not only is fighting bad but in girls it is very unattractive and un-lady-like, which is Aunt Alexandra's motive for being at their house, but with Jem and all boys it is very hard to control anger at a young age and him being able to take all that criticizm about his dad, who he loves very much, and not fight shows just how mature and how strong Jem really is. Even after most of the steam from the fight cooled off 'un-lady-like' was still being brought up, "You'll have a very unladylike scar on your wedding-ring finger." (Lee, 87). which just goes to show you that no matter What scout does be it good or bad it will always reflect on her not being lady-like.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:52 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout experienced "coming of age" in chapter nine. She learns that fighting someone is not a good way to handle a situation. Scout rather use violence when she is angry rather than talking it out and acting like a lady. She illustrates coming of age on pag 74. She says, "I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to hold it in, the better off everybody would be." Scout, after being talked to by Atticus, realized that fighting and violence would never resolve an issue. That is why she chose not to get into a brawl with Cecil Jacobs. This will effect the way she acts through out the rest of the book in two ways. Scout will be able to control herself when she is being harassed because of her father defending Tom Robinson. It will also be a start for her to become more like a lady and less of a tomboy. I believe by the end of the book Scout will act less like a boy and it began with her not fighting.

Jem experiences coming of age in a similar way. In chapter eleven Jem takes out his anger on Mrs. Dubose's garden and hr flowers. He also snapped Scout's baton in half. Jem learned that acting out in such violent ways are not the way to go about things because of the consequences that follow. On page 104 Atticus says, " I strongly advise you to go down and have a talk with Mrs. Dubose." When he went down to her home and he is told that he needs to read to her. That is when Jem learns that there is a consequence with evey action and he will no longer lash his anger In such ways. This will effet the rest of the story because Jem will become more mature and learn to make wiser decisions.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:54 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Scout and Jem both have multiple experiences which lead up to their "coming of age," and it shohuld be noted tha the lessons taught by these experiences, as well as the age of their "coming of age," are experienced much earlier than the age at which they are experienced in most of today's "cusioned" life. But the lessons that they learn can still be applied to today's life, as well as to the rest of the story.

Scout is a tomboy, brought up with the idea that being a girl was something to avoid at all costs. To quote Jem, "I swear scout, sometimes you act so much like a girl it's mortifying." However, she learns many other things as well. For example, she learns from Atticus that he should never judge someone just by appearence, that she should, "[...] climb into his skin and walk around in it." She even uses this lesson after Jem had barey made it back form his excursion to the Radley house alive. "As Atticus ha once advised me, I tried to climb into Jem's skin and walk around in it." This will help her when she goes to the trial, so that she can put come up with her own unbiased opinion of what the verdict should be, because, not yet quite understanding or believing in racism, she would be able to put herself in the place of the opposing parties, determine what she would have done, and so come up with an idea of what was false or true based on her own opinions. This lesson would also be advantageous in life, for if she was trying to determine how to act towards a person, or how to intemperate their actions, words, or the person him/herself, as a whole.

Jem learns a similar lesson, though it is later in the book. He learns to think about how others would feel, and think about how he would feel if he was the other person - in short the Golden Rule: Treat others the way you want to be treated. From Atticus, told to the reader through Scout, "How would we like it if Atticus barged in on us, without knocking, when we were in our room at night? We were, in effect, doing the same thing t Mr. Radley." This is often hammered, carved, and brainwashed into little children as the most important thing in life, without them having any knowledge of what it means, (outside of a long-winded and hard-to-follow explanation from a teacher) what it has to do with anything or why it is so important, or how it applies to actual life. Because of this, as well as many other factors, (such as the want to achieve and maintain popularity) by teenage years, this lesson is often forgotten, or intentionally ignored. So, it comes to no surprise that Jem quickly forgets, or intentionally ignores this life lesson and ventures into the Radley yard. However, this lesson can be important in the story, for when he is at the trial, at school, or if people make fun of him, he may think of this lesson, seeing that the kids at school are just repeating what their parents say, and so are just being brought up with the idea that racism is okay. In life, this lesson could be applied multiple ways, but arguably most prominently in school, where the opinions and actions of a person can drastically change the lives of another, as shown in cases of attempted or successful suicide, most often due to bullying. This lesson surprised me by breaking the pattern of learning it early, seeing as most of us pretty much had this drilled into our brains since about kindergarten or first grade, while Jem learns it well past such an age.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:56 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
I believe that Scout has changed a great deal since the beginning of the book. In the beginning of the book Scout is perceived to be a very tom-boyish girl that was not afraid of getting her hands dirty and enjoyed being around and acting like a boy throughout her earlier years. You can tell that she almost takes it to offense when Jem calls her girly for example, on pages 51-52 Jem says, "Scout I'm tellin' you for the last time, shut your trap or go home - I declare to the Lord your gettin' more like a girl everyday." Scout was taken back by comments like these whether it was from Jem, extended family members, or even comments from Mrs. Dubose. But throughout later chapters she becomes aware of her position as a "real" girl. As in chapter 12 when Jem and Scout tag along with Cal. to her church she gets all dressed up without a complaint. Also as Jem grows older he is having less time to spend with Scout and this leads to Scout to become more of a mature girl as she is finding herself in the kitchen with Cal. more often and enjoying herself more than less. I also believe that Scout has changed since the beginning because during the first few chapters, Scout had absolutely no self control over her temper and what she said was the first thing that came to her mind. You could say Scout had no "filter" on what she said. But as the chapters progressed she learned some sort of control from the teachings of Atticus.

Jem has taken some large steps towards being a man in these 14 chapters. He learns important lessons in these chapter but the main lesson he learns is the lesson of giving a little for someone in need can go a long way for that person. For example in the story, after Jem terrorizes Mrs. Dubose's plants and is forced to read to her, he learns that he was doing her such a big favor. He was giving her a reason to live another day even though she was so close to her death. Atticus explains this to Jem on page 112, it says, "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun." Atticus is teaching Jem a very important lesson here about the small things in life and to learn from the experiences of others.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:57 AM as a reply to Jake Filthaut.
I agree with what Jake said because in a way he talks about what I did. I believe that Scout needs to control her anger and this is what lead to learning about racism. This helps Scout learn her lesson about how it is in the real world. She is told that she shouldn't take matters into his own hand and to leave it to the the grown ups.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 12:59 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
As far as scout's coming of age, you can see her thought process begining to change as she grows odler. Part of her change in thoughts come from disiplinary actions taken by Aticus for her misbehavior. For example, back in the start of the book when scout started to go to school, she would blurt out what ever was on her mind about anyone and their family background. This lead to many fights that Scout became involved in. Aticus explained to her how you can't do that to people. Also, scout used to be verry supersticous. She, as well as Dill and Jem, used to belive every rumor about Boo Radley that she heard, even the one that he eats cats. Now in the point of Scouts life that we are reading about, she has some what faded away from the whole topic in general. These all jst show that scout is becoming older.

As for Jem, he is entering what i like to call the "tough guy stage". He starts to obsess over football and becomes a jerk to his sister and does not like to be seen around her. That is a typical 12 year old for you. When i was around that age i went through a similar phaze as him. I would do everything possible to not be seen alongside my little brother, and if we were somewhere in public and someone i knew was in sight i would shove him away. I felt like it was something i had to do to prove myself to my dad that i wasn't a little kid anymore. Maybe that's what jem sees it as too.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 1:01 AM as a reply to Jake Filthaut.
Jake Filthaut:
Scout indeed has learned many lessons in this story about coming of age. To me, the most important one is when she learns about how racism affects most of their town, and the most of the United states. She is first introduced to this when Atticus takes on the black man as his client. Atticus told scout that they most likely will not win the case and will be mocked around town for it. When scout asks him why he tells her, "Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us to try to win."(pg 76) The entire conversation that Atticus has with scout on pages 74-76 further enhance Scouts knowledge of african Americans and how they are viewed and treated in that designated time period. from this point on, after Atticus has shed light on the subject, scout will no longer refer to African Americans as n****rs and wil view them as any other human being.

Jem on the other hand learned many lessons himself through these chapters. one of the main ones though was personal space. Unfortunately, Jem learned his lesson the hard way, through the mistakes he made. With the radley house just down the street, Jem, Scout, and Dill were always snooping around it. With all the ghost stories gossiped around town about the mysterious Boo Radley, the children were intregued, just like any other child hearing a ghost story. Jem was even dared by Dill to touch the house which freightened all the children. Even after that incedent though, Jem was still questioning the existance of Boo so he decided to attempt to contact the mysterious stranger. He, scout and Dill wrote Boo a note asking him to come outside so they could hangout and buy him an icecream. Jem tried casting it into the window with his fishing pole when theyr father Atticus stepped in on them. Atticus said, "Son, I'm going to tell you something and tell you one time: stop tormenting that man. That goes for the other two of you." (pg. 49) Jem, from that moment on no longer messed around with the Radley house again, partly because of his fear of Atticus and partly for the respect that he felt for him. In the next few chapters, I predict that Jem will no longer disturb the Radleys and further respect them for who they are.



*****Mr.lindsay this is not my required reply******* but jake, this does not sound like you, just saying. But if it is, way to go little boy.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 1:07 AM as a reply to Kaylee Danaher.
Kaylee Danaher:
Scout experienced "coming of age" in chapter nine. She learns that fighting someone is not a good way to handle a situation. Scout rather use violence when she is angry rather than talking it out and acting like a lady. She illustrates coming of age on pag 74. She says, "I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to hold it in, the better off everybody would be." Scout, after being talked to by Atticus, realized that fighting and violence would never resolve an issue. That is why she chose not to get into a brawl with Cecil Jacobs. This will effect the way she acts through out the rest of the book in two ways. Scout will be able to control herself when she is being harassed because of her father defending Tom Robinson. It will also be a start for her to become more like a lady and less of a tomboy. I believe by the end of the book Scout will act less like a boy and it began with her not fighting.

Jem experiences coming of age in a similar way. In chapter eleven Jem takes out his anger on Mrs. Dubose's garden and hr flowers. He also snapped Scout's baton in half. Jem learned that acting out in such violent ways are not the way to go about things because of the consequences that follow. On page 104 Atticus says, " I strongly advise you to go down and have a talk with Mrs. Dubose." When he went down to her home and he is told that he needs to read to her. That is when Jem learns that there is a consequence with evey action and he will no longer lash his anger In such ways. This will effet the rest of the story because Jem will become more mature and learn to make wiser decisions.



Dear Ms.Danaher,
Thank you for elightening me with this work of art homework asignment. I completely agree with your opinoins and observations on Scout and Jem's coming of age expeiriences. I look forward to reading more of your peices in further discousions about this wonderful peice of literature we are reading in the best english class in all of RHAM Highschool.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 1:08 AM as a reply to Griffin Cassata.
Griffin Cassata:
Scout had a "coming of age" experience when Aunt Alexandra came to stay in chapter 13. Aunt Alexandra is the type of lady who wants Scout to grow up 'lady-like' so when she visited she kept mentioning to scout to act like a lady. Her whole life Scout was insulted by Jem saying "I declare to the Lord you're gettin' more like a girl every day!" (Lee, 52). Aunt Alexandra just wanted Scout to grow up lady-like. Aunt Alexandra saw something in Scout no one else did, "[...] but you have a daughter to think of. A daughter whos growing up." (Lee, 137). So when Aunt Alexandra came over and showed Scout how to be a lady and told her it was okay to be a lady, Scout rejected the lady-like lessons. But i thnk later in the story Scout will become more lady-like than Aunt Alexandra herself.

emoticon emoticon

Jem experienced a "coming of age" event when ha had to read books to Mrs. Dubose as payback for destroying her camelia bushes. He had just bought Scout a new Baton with his own money and on their way back from the store he took her baton and swung at the heads of each of Mrs. Dubose's camelia bushes, "He did nnot begin to calm down untill he had cut the tops of every camellia bush [...] He bent my baton against his knee, snapped it in two and threw it down." (Lee, 103). He later confessed because Atticus forced him to and his punishment was to read to her every day for a month. This event tought him to take responsibility for his own actions and to follow through with punishments, even though the punishments are drudgery.



I agree that Scout's experiences with Aunt Alexandra are a coming of age experience. However, I do not think that the rest of the story will have much to do with how lady-like Scout is, and so I do not think that this will impact either the outcome of the story or the story in general. The main focus of the story seems to be shifting from Scout playing and her relations with others to the trial and how it will affect her, Jem and Atticus, as well as Maycomb in general. I agree that Jem had a coming of age experience with Mrs. Dubose, and that he learned responsibility. This lesson that he learned could play a major part in the remainder of the story, seeing as great responsibility is put on Jem already, and it is not even the trial, therefore even more will be required as the trial draws closer. I believe that this lesson shows him that responsibility is not just something you can talk about. If one screws up, one must take responsibility for his actions. This shows him the consequences of not dealing with responsibility, even for a second, seeing as it was his responsibility to not mind Mrs. Dubose and her insults, and not take any action against her, to "be a gentleman." Yet he slacked on that responsibility for a few minutes, and was then faced with the responsibility of taking the consequences. Nice use of a vocab word, by the way.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 1:09 AM as a reply to Kaylee Danaher.
Kaylee Danaher:
Scout experienced "coming of age" in chapter nine. She learns that fighting someone is not a good way to handle a situation. Scout rather use violence when she is angry rather than talking it out and acting like a lady. She illustrates coming of age on pag 74. She says, "I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to hold it in, the better off everybody would be." Scout, after being talked to by Atticus, realized that fighting and violence would never resolve an issue. That is why she chose not to get into a brawl with Cecil Jacobs. This will effect the way she acts through out the rest of the book in two ways. Scout will be able to control herself when she is being harassed because of her father defending Tom Robinson. It will also be a start for her to become more like a lady and less of a tomboy. I believe by the end of the book Scout will act less like a boy and it began with her not fighting.

Jem experiences coming of age in a similar way. In chapter eleven Jem takes out his anger on Mrs. Dubose's garden and hr flowers. He also snapped Scout's baton in half. Jem learned that acting out in such violent ways are not the way to go about things because of the consequences that follow. On page 104 Atticus says, " I strongly advise you to go down and have a talk with Mrs. Dubose." When he went down to her home and he is told that he needs to read to her. That is when Jem learns that there is a consequence with evey action and he will no longer lash his anger In such ways. This will effet the rest of the story because Jem will become more mature and learn to make wiser decisions.


I agree with what she said about Scout and holding herself back from fighting the other boy. She chose to do the more lady like and more appropriate thing and listen to Atticus' advice and just walk away and be the better person. Scout will soon realize that being more mature than the rest will benefit her in many ways and people will show her respect and give her the attention that she wants as a growing child.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 1:09 AM as a reply to Emory Bowen.
Emory Bowen:
Scout learns the lesson that you cant fight someone just because they said something insulting. At the begining of the book she hits Francis because of what he calls her father. After talks with her father she realizes that fighting isnt going to help her. This is her "coming of age". She grows more mature about dealing with people talking about her father. At school she was teased about it and had to think back at what her father had told her. "Atticus had promised me he would wear me out if he ever heard of me fighting any more; I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner i learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be." (pg. 74). You can tell that she is becoming more mature because she remembers what her father tells her. She takes a moment to think about what she is about to do. Later on in the book, When Scout and Jem are walking to the store, Mrs. Dubose calls their father the same thing Francis had. Scout resists going over and hitting her. This is when you can tell she is really "coming of age.".


Jem learned alot about controling his anger too. When he couldnt handle Mrs. Dubose's comment about his father, Jem ruins her garden. Responsibility is an important thing to learn as you grow older. It has alot to do with "coming of age" because you have to be responsible when your older. Jems father tells him to go appologize to mrs. Dubose and so he does. "She wants me to come every afternoon after school and Saturdays and read to her out loud for two hours."(pg 105). Jem didnt want to do this but he followed through because that was his consequence. This showed how Jem was becoming more mature.



I agree with this. Both Jem and Scout learn how to control their anger and have displayed acts of violence that they have both learned a lesson from. They both learned lessons that helped them come to age and mature, like what Emory said. Due the consequences they have both learned to not act out in such ways.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 1:57 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
The lesson Scout has learned so far in "To Kill a Mockingbird" is that fighting does not solve every problem. in the beginning of the story Scout was always fighting other kids because they had insulted her. But Atticus teaches her that it is better to be brave and back away from a fight, than to fight back just because you are insulted. On page 74 Scout shows how she has matured by saying, "I was far too old and too big for such childish things". This shows how Scout is now thinking before she acts and is realizing that fighting is immature and childish. However, I think on the inside sometimes Scout wants to fight back, and later in the story I think she will not be thinking clearly and get in a fight with someone for calling Atticus a "nigger-lover", because this in particular seems to frustrate her even though she does not fully understand the phrase.

Jem has learned a lesson so far in the story as well. What Jem has learned us that courage is not just about being able to be physically strong, real courage is being mentally strong. In the beginning of the story being courageous to Jem was touching the Radleys house. But now after visiting Mrs. Dubose and seeing how mentally courageous she was, Jem is learning what real courage is. Atticus explains This to Jem on page 112 when he say, "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea tahr courage is a nab with a gun". Atticus is explaining to Jem that Mrs. Dubose had real courage and he should have courage like that instead of what his idea of courage used to be. I think later in the story Jem will have this courage that Atticus is talking about when it matters most.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:02 AM as a reply to Tyler Brett.
Tyler Brett:
I believe that Scout has changed a great deal since the beginning of the book. In the beginning of the book Scout is perceived to be a very tom-boyish girl that was not afraid of getting her hands dirty and enjoyed being around and acting like a boy throughout her earlier years. You can tell that she almost takes it to offense when Jem calls her girly for example, on pages 51-52 Jem says, "Scout I'm tellin' you for the last time, shut your trap or go home - I declare to the Lord your gettin' more like a girl everyday." Scout was taken back by comments like these whether it was from Jem, extended family members, or even comments from Mrs. Dubose. But throughout later chapters she becomes aware of her position as a "real" girl. As in chapter 12 when Jem and Scout tag along with Cal. to her church she gets all dressed up without a complaint. Also as Jem grows older he is having less time to spend with Scout and this leads to Scout to become more of a mature girl as she is finding herself in the kitchen with Cal. more often and enjoying herself more than less. I also believe that Scout has changed since the beginning because during the first few chapters, Scout had absolutely no self control over her temper and what she said was the first thing that came to her mind. You could say Scout had no "filter" on what she said. But as the chapters progressed she learned some sort of control from the teachings of Atticus.

Jem has taken some large steps towards being a man in these 14 chapters. He learns important lessons in these chapter but the main lesson he learns is the lesson of giving a little for someone in need can go a long way for that person. For example in the story, after Jem terrorizes Mrs. Dubose's plants and is forced to read to her, he learns that he was doing her such a big favor. He was giving her a reason to live another day even though she was so close to her death. Atticus explains this to Jem on page 112, it says, "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun." Atticus is teaching Jem a very important lesson here about the small things in life and to learn from the experiences of others.


I agree with you that Scout is becoming more like a girl as the story progresses. When Uncle Jack gave Jem and Scout air rifles they were both excited to have them but in the story it only tells of Jem using his. So far in teh story Scout has not used hers yet as far as we know. This shows that she is more like a girl because shooting is more of a boys activity.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:09 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
I believe that both Jem and Scout have become more responsible people as the book goes on. A coming-of-age lesson that Scout has learned to show that her responsibility has grown is that in the beginning of the book she says, “She was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t ready to come. Our battles were epic and one-sided. Calpurnia always won, mainly because Atticus always took her side” (page 6). If you compare this to all the time that Scout and Jem have been spending with Calpurnia with Atticus gone, you can notice a big change in Scout’s attitude. On page 126 Calpurnia says, “ Any time you want to,” she said. “We’d be glad to have you.” In the beginning Calpurnia and Scout were always fighting but after Scout has grown more, she is now wanting to stay with Calpurnia and is having civilized talks with her just like as if she was a grown up. This will affect the rest of the book because Scout will learn to respect grown ups more and learn to become more an adult.

Jem has showed an increase in responsibility because in the beginning of the book, Jem would always fool around with Dill and Scout and play childish games. He wouldn’t really behave as well as he does when he is older. Ever since he has been called “Mister Jem,” he has started to act more grown up and less childish. An example of this is on page 141 Jem says, “Dill, I had to tell him,” he said. “You can’t run three hundred miles off without your mother knowin’.” Jem shows that he made the right decision to tell Atticus about such a dangerous action that Dill has done. In the beginning of the book, I think Jem would have went along with it and not told Atticus because he wouldn’t of known what to do. Now with a more knowledge of the world around him, he is able to make the right decisions. This will affect the rest of the book because Jem will know what to do in a difficult situation because he has had more experiences in the world.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:05 AM as a reply to kylie isabelle verrengia.
kylie isabelle verrengia:
Scout is a young girl who was always raised as one of the guys. She grew up different and not as a regular girl would, but i feel like this taught her many more things than any other girl would've learned. One lesson Scout learns is pride. In many cases throughout the book Scout learned and demonstrated pride. One example is when she speaks with her father and Calpurnia about Walter Cunningham. In the beginning of the story she sees Walter as a poor boy with no potential and that he was a waste of time. Soon after she begins school for her first year she beats up Walter thinking no one would care. Scout grew up fighting because she grew up hanging out with her brother and Dill. While hurting Walter, Jem comes over and makes her stop and invites Walter to dinner. At dinner Atticus begins talking to Walter as if he was an adult. When this started i think it began to show Scout how everyone is human and even if they may not have that much money, people are equal. Cal says to her, "Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty!" (p.24) This was the first talk which started to teach Scout about a person's pride and how money doesn't have a lot to do with it, but instead manners and confidence. As the book progresses she begins learning more and more about pride. Another example is when she is at Uncle Jack's for Christmas and Francis is making fun of her father so she beats him up. Uncle Jack decides to teach her lesson for fighting when he didn't know the whole story, he whips her. Scout thought about running, but decided against it. Not only that, but when she has the opportunity to get Francis in trouble she says no so she can have her pride in her father's eyes.

Jem also learned lessons about Pride. Jem grew up being a good boy who never once got whipped by his father. This was Jem's version of pride; He always wanted to show his dad that he was just like him and was proud. Jem says, "I – it's like this, Scout," he muttered. "Atticus ain't ever whipped me since I can remember. I wanta keep it that way."(p.56) Through this quote it is seen how much Jem will do to stay good in his father's eyes, including going back to the Radley's house. In this time period it was all about image, especially to Jem who wanted to grow up and be Atticus. He plans to be a lawyer at this point in the book because of Atticus. Jem loses his pride at parts in the book including when he ruined Mrs. Dubose's camellia bushes and had to earn his pride back by reading to her, showing her that he would pay the time for the crime he had committed. So, both kids have learned a lot about pride throughout the story and even though they lost it at times, they would always win it back.


I agree that because Scout is a tom boy, it effects how she learns things. Just like you said she grew up fighting because of her brother and Dill, that changes how she looks at things. She always goes to fighting first even if its not the "lady" thing to do. She isnt use to pride until she learns it from her father and brother. I think this is what surprises her and eventually impacts her the most. When Jem invites Walter over to eat, Scout follows his example because she looks up to him. I think that Jem and Atticus are good role models for her and thats why she is growing up so well.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:11 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Jem has matured throughout the story noticeably. Before Jem went through the period of time where he read to Mrs. Dubose, he responded very emotionally to the various names that she used to describe Atticus. After he read to her, he leaned to control his emotions. An example of this is on page 110 it says, "Jem's chin would come up, and he would gaze at Mrs. Dubose with a face devoid of resentment. Through the weeks he had cultivated an expression of polite and detached interest, which he would present to her in answer to her more blood-curdling inventions." This shows that instead of flipping out on Mrs. Dubose, Jem had developed a facial expression to respond to the harsh remarks that she would spit at him. By developing this detatchment, Jem may be able to handle the difficulties that Atticus had warned him might be coming because of him taking on the case of Tom Robinson.

Scout's coming of age moment occurs after the fight she had with Francis. When Francis kept persistently referring to Atticus as a "nigger-lover", Scout wasn't able to hold back her anger. Before this fight, on page 76 Atticus takes Scout on his lap and tells her to remeber that, "...no matter how bitter things get they are still our friends and this is still our home." This is when Scout begins to feel the guilt for letting Atticus down and she decides not to ever let him down again. After she decides this she ends up getting in an argument with Cecil Jacobs. But after remembering what she had promised to Atticus, she was able to bring herself to walk away from what would have been a fight with Cecil. Although she fought with Francis after this three weeks of self-control, she is able to resist the temptation of overreacting to the cruel remarks of Mrs. Dubose. This suggests that although she cannot always control her actions, she is developing a stronger will to not let Atticus down.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:13 AM as a reply to Kaylee Danaher.
Kaylee Danaher:
Scout experienced "coming of age" in chapter nine. She learns that fighting someone is not a good way to handle a situation. Scout rather use violence when she is angry rather than talking it out and acting like a lady. She illustrates coming of age on pag 74. She says, "I was far too old and too big for such childish things, and the sooner I learned to hold it in, the better off everybody would be." Scout, after being talked to by Atticus, realized that fighting and violence would never resolve an issue. That is why she chose not to get into a brawl with Cecil Jacobs. This will effect the way she acts through out the rest of the book in two ways. Scout will be able to control herself when she is being harassed because of her father defending Tom Robinson. It will also be a start for her to become more like a lady and less of a tomboy. I believe by the end of the book Scout will act less like a boy and it began with her not fighting.

Jem experiences coming of age in a similar way. In chapter eleven Jem takes out his anger on Mrs. Dubose's garden and hr flowers. He also snapped Scout's baton in half. Jem learned that acting out in such violent ways are not the way to go about things because of the consequences that follow. On page 104 Atticus says, " I strongly advise you to go down and have a talk with Mrs. Dubose." When he went down to her home and he is told that he needs to read to her. That is when Jem learns that there is a consequence with evey action and he will no longer lash his anger In such ways. This will effet the rest of the story because Jem will become more mature and learn to make wiser decisions.


I agree with you about how Scout has changed to not fighting as much anymore. She had a big temptation to fight Cecil after he was making fun of Atticus, but Scout remembered what Atticus had told her and refused to start a fight and back away from the temptation. I also agree with you about Jem because he has learned from his mistakes and learned to fix them as best as he can. He listened to Atticus about reading to Mrs. Dubose and didn’t disagree with him.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:17 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
So far in To Kill A Mockingbird, Scout has been faced with multiple challenging situations. One of these include when she was comparing her father, Atticus, to some of the other fathers of her classmates in school. Scout sees all of the other fathers as involved and young where she views Atticus as an old man with little abilities to his name. On page 89 it says, “Our father didn’t do anything. He worked in an office, not in a drugstore. Atticus did not drive a dump-truck for the county, he was not the sheriff, he did not farm, work in a garage, or do anything that could possibly arouse the admiration of anyone…He did not do the things our schoolmates’ fathers did: he never went hunting, he did not play poker or fish or drink or smoke. He sat in the living room and read.” She was embarrassed by her father rather than proud of what made him different. Later on in the chapter, after Scout learned about her father being talented at shooting, Jem told her that it didn’t matter if Atticus could or couldn’t do anything at all. Scout learned that it doesn’t matter how much a person has to the name from the past that makes the person who they are, it’s how a person treats and acts towards others in each moment. Scout could apply this in the future by connecting it to Tom Robinson, the man that Atticus is defending or to Boo Radley because so far, what she knows about them is only what she has heard.
Jem learned that courage is more than appearing as being the toughest, but knowing what will happen will not be easy, yet pushing yourself to continue nevertheless because you know what is truly right. Jem learned this through Atticus after being told about Mrs. Dubose’s death. Atticus told him that even if Jem hadn’t lost his temper, he would’ve told him to read to Mrs. Dubose because he wanted him to see what courage really is. On page 112, Atticus says, “I wanted you to see something about her- I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin but you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do.” Jem can use this in the future because he knows what it’s going to take to withstand the criticism and harsh treatment from Atticus defending Tom Robinson, but being able to continue on strong with true courage.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:29 AM as a reply to Joseph Pilver.
Joseph Pilver:
Jem has a coming of age lesson when Calpurnia, Scout and him are talking about how most of the people at First Purchase are illierate. Before this conversation, Jem believes that everyone can read and write and that everyone gets the same education. This conversation with Calpurnia shows Jem that not all people get the same things and that not everyone is able to get the same things, especially during the great depression. The point where Jem really learns this is page 125, "Maybe because they can't read. Cal, did you teach Zeebo?' 'Yeah, Mister Jem. there wasn't a school even when he was a boy. I made him learn though." I believe this is the point that Jem has a coming of age moment, realizing that not all people get the same things and that not everyone gets educated. By the end of the story i think this lesson may be very important to Jem. When Jem is a little more grown up and starts getting involved in whats going on in the outside world, it will be good for him to know that not everyone is treated equal.

Scout has a coming of age lesson when Uncle Jack hits her for chasing after, insulting and hitting Francis. Before this incident, Scout believes that all of her problems can be solved by fighting. She thinks that if someone provokes her, she can come out swinging and that will make everything better. When she punches Francis in the face and Uncle Jack and the rest of the family comes out she starts to see the error in her ways. Uncle Jack hitting her is the next step to her finally learning that bad choices lead to bad consequences. The real point where she has a coming-of-age lesson is when she is talking to Uncle Jack and she realizes Francis is going to have to go through what she went through, "... I knew Francis was in for it. " I've got a good mind to go out there tonight.' 'Please sir, just let it go. Please." (86) At this point Scout realizes that her wrong doing is going to cost Francis as well as her and that unless she wants people to hate her, she should stop fighting so much.


I think that it is important that you touched base with the fact that Jem realizes there is inequality. Going to church with Calpurnia helped him to realize the world from a different perspective where not everyone lives the same way as he amd Scout do. For Scout it seems to me that it is less about how other people think of her and more about her own sense of morality that she gains here. Through physical aggression, she realizes that she doesn't gain Francis' understanding. If she were to try to interact with Francis, she would be able to see his side of the story - so maybe this would help her to stop overreacting to the cruel remarks thrownat her and her father.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 2:31 AM as a reply to Alexandra Burgess.
Alexandra Burgess:
I believe that both Jem and Scout have become more responsible people as the book goes on. A coming-of-age lesson that Scout has learned to show that her responsibility has grown is that in the beginning of the book she says, “She was always ordering me out of the kitchen, asking me why I couldn’t behave as well as Jem when she knew he was older, and calling me home when I wasn’t ready to come. Our battles were epic and one-sided. Calpurnia always won, mainly because Atticus always took her side” (page 6). If you compare this to all the time that Scout and Jem have been spending with Calpurnia with Atticus gone, you can notice a big change in Scout’s attitude. On page 126 Calpurnia says, “ Any time you want to,” she said. “We’d be glad to have you.” In the beginning Calpurnia and Scout were always fighting but after Scout has grown more, she is now wanting to stay with Calpurnia and is having civilized talks with her just like as if she was a grown up. This will affect the rest of the book because Scout will learn to respect grown ups more and learn to become more an adult.

Jem has showed an increase in responsibility because in the beginning of the book, Jem would always fool around with Dill and Scout and play childish games. He wouldn’t really behave as well as he does when he is older. Ever since he has been called “Mister Jem,” he has started to act more grown up and less childish. An example of this is on page 141 Jem says, “Dill, I had to tell him,” he said. “You can’t run three hundred miles off without your mother knowin’.” Jem shows that he made the right decision to tell Atticus about such a dangerous action that Dill has done. In the beginning of the book, I think Jem would have went along with it and not told Atticus because he wouldn’t of known what to do. Now with a more knowledge of the world around him, he is able to make the right decisions. This will affect the rest of the book because Jem will know what to do in a difficult situation because he has had more experiences in the world.


I agree that Scout and Calpurnia's relationship has grown over the course of the story, affecting how she respects other adults. I also think that because she has seen that relationships can grow after a length of time and even though a relationship may not always start out on the same terms, after people get to know each other and grow up with each other, there is a greater chance of being closer to the other person. In the future, this will allow her to know to not give up on people from her initial impressions. I also agree that Jem has become more responsible and aware of consequences, which in the future could help him also when facing situations involving Atticus defending Tom Robinson.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 3:17 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
One coming-of-age lesson that Scout learns is that not everyone percieves Atticus the same way she does. When Scout goes to school, the students call Atticus names. On page 75, "Cecil Jacobs made me forget. He had announced in the schoolyard the day before that Scout Finch's daddy defended niggers." Before that, Scout viewed Atticus as almost perfect. Being a child, she almost doesn't think about Attucus's life outside of family. She views him as a family man. She hadn't realized that sometimes adults have to go through hardships and have to deal with problems. In this case Atticus has decided to go against the views of Maycomb and stand up for what he believes in. Before this Scout only really thought about the wonders of childhood. All she wanted to do was play with Jem and Dill, not really caring about anything else. It is hearing about this case that makes her realize that there is a whole other world with adults and the troubles they must face. Atticus says that every laywer has a case that affects him personally. On page 76, " 'Because I could never ask you to mind me again. Scout, simply by nature of the work, every lawyer gets at least one case in his lifetime that affects him personally. This one's mine, I guess.' "

One coming-of-age lesson that Jem is when he finds out that Atticus can shoot a gun. It was after they found a mad dog and the sheriff felt that Atticus would be more suited to shoot is rather than himself. Atticus shot and killed the dog. Jem was stunned that Atticus could do that. Before this incident jem viewed Atticus as an almost god-like figure. On page 97, " 'What's the matter with you, boy, can't you talk?' said Mr. Tate, grinning at Jem. 'Didn't you know your daddy's--' " It is a similar realization that Scout had. He learns that Atticus can do something other than be his father. He only viewed Atticus as giving him helpful advice or giving him a hug when he's sad. He didn't seem to understand that his father has a life other than family. Children don't see their parents as regular people, and this is the point at which Jem did.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 4:07 AM as a reply to kylie isabelle verrengia.
kylie isabelle verrengia:
Scout is a young girl who was always raised as one of the guys. She grew up different and not as a regular girl would, but i feel like this taught her many more things than any other girl would've learned. One lesson Scout learns is pride. In many cases throughout the book Scout learned and demonstrated pride. One example is when she speaks with her father and Calpurnia about Walter Cunningham. In the beginning of the story she sees Walter as a poor boy with no potential and that he was a waste of time. Soon after she begins school for her first year she beats up Walter thinking no one would care. Scout grew up fighting because she grew up hanging out with her brother and Dill. While hurting Walter, Jem comes over and makes her stop and invites Walter to dinner. At dinner Atticus begins talking to Walter as if he was an adult. When this started i think it began to show Scout how everyone is human and even if they may not have that much money, people are equal. Cal says to her, "Hush your mouth! Don't matter who they are, anybody sets foot in this house's yo' comp'ny, and don't you let me catch you remarkin' on their ways like you was so high and mighty!" (p.24) This was the first talk which started to teach Scout about a person's pride and how money doesn't have a lot to do with it, but instead manners and confidence. As the book progresses she begins learning more and more about pride. Another example is when she is at Uncle Jack's for Christmas and Francis is making fun of her father so she beats him up. Uncle Jack decides to teach her lesson for fighting when he didn't know the whole story, he whips her. Scout thought about running, but decided against it. Not only that, but when she has the opportunity to get Francis in trouble she says no so she can have her pride in her father's eyes.

Jem also learned lessons about Pride. Jem grew up being a good boy who never once got whipped by his father. This was Jem's version of pride; He always wanted to show his dad that he was just like him and was proud. Jem says, "I – it's like this, Scout," he muttered. "Atticus ain't ever whipped me since I can remember. I wanta keep it that way."(p.56) Through this quote it is seen how much Jem will do to stay good in his father's eyes, including going back to the Radley's house. In this time period it was all about image, especially to Jem who wanted to grow up and be Atticus. He plans to be a lawyer at this point in the book because of Atticus. Jem loses his pride at parts in the book including when he ruined Mrs. Dubose's camellia bushes and had to earn his pride back by reading to her, showing her that he would pay the time for the crime he had committed. So, both kids have learned a lot about pride throughout the story and even though they lost it at times, they would always win it back.


I agree that the Finches have a lot of pride another example of this is when the children at school make fun of Atticus for defending Tom Robinson. Scout starts fighting those students. Atticus then later tells Scout not to fight the children at school. On page 76, "You might hear some ugly talk about it at school, but do one thing for me if you will: you just hold your head high and keep those fists down. No matter what antbody says to you, don't let 'em get your goat." Atticus does not want Scout dropping to their level. He wants Scout to keep her head held high. Atticus is trying to prepare his children for their future and not to become like that. This is helping Scout and Jem gain pride throughout the book, Atticus is teaching them to.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 10:51 AM as a reply to Ian Lindsay.
Hello Mr. Lindsay. I kind of remembered this this morning so shhhh.

Jem an Scout have gone on many adventures so far in the beginning of this novel. But to me, one situation really stands out to me as the one moment that made Scout come of age was the Francis incident. "If Uncle Atticus lets you run around with stray dogs, that's his own business, like Grandma says, so it ain't your fault. I guess it ain't your fault if Uncle Atticus is a (expletive)-lover besides, but I'm here to tell you it certainly does mortify the rest of the family--" Those words were spoken by Francis Hancock on page 83. Scout at first calmly tries to make him take it back, and after a brief intrusion by Alexandra, when Francis taunted Scout again, she ended up clocking him in the jaw. She is then disciplined, but when Uncle Jack hears the full story, and Scout asks what an (expletive)-lover is to Atticus, she really finds out what it means to start growing up and start understanding her family. If i was to pick another situation where Scout came of age, i would pick the day she went to church with Calpurnia, where she learns that white people aren't the only racists. I think Scout will now really take Atticus's advice of no fighting to heart, and she will really begin to respect Atticus for what he is doing.

Jem comes of age a tad later after Scout does. He really learns what becoming a man means through the Dubose incident. After briefly going insane and taking it out on Miss Dubose's yard, he is tasked to apologize to Miss Dubose and do what it takes to earn that apology. He doesn't enjoy what he has to do, but after on page 112, where Atticus and Jem hold a discussion that says, "'You know, [Miss Dubose] was a great lady.' [said Atticus] 'A lday?' Jem raised his head. His face was scarlet. 'After all those things she said about you, a lady' 'She was, she had her own view about things, a lot different from mine, maybe ... son, I told you if you hadn't lost your head I'd have made you go read to her. I wanted you to see something about her [...]" (you know the rest). That is when Jem really learns that to be a good person when you grow up, you must learn to respect others beliefs and act rationally when confronted with a conflict. I think this will stop Jem from acting irresponsibly in the future, and will really guide him in his actions.
Flag Flag
RE: Dicussion Question #1
4/9/12 10:57 AM as a reply to James Hayden.
James Hayden:
Both the characters of Jem and Scout learn many a lesson in (what one could call) "Act 1" of Harper Lee's "To Kill A Mockingbird"

The protagonist, Jean Louise "Scout" Finch learns a good deal about life in the first part of this story. On her first day of school, Scout gets into trouble with her teacher, Miss Caroline, due to the fact that Scout is already literate, eliminating a majority of Miss Caroline's job of teaching the six-year-old. She, in turn, goes to her father for advice on the matter, not wanting to stop reading all together as instructed by her teacher. Upon hearing Scout's unfair and biased judging of Miss Caroline, Atticus gives Scout this piece of advice which she shows to take to heart in later chapters: "You'll never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view...until you climb in his skin and walk around in it."(Pg 30). This is what one could consider a classic take on the proverb: "Don't judge a person until you walk a mile in their shoes.", meaning that if you truly do not know what a person's life is/has been like, you hold no right to judge them for their actions. Perhaps this will affect her opinion regarding the upcoming trial? There is no other way to find out but to read on.
.
Also, the (what one may call the deautagonist) brother of Scout, Jeremy Atticus "Jem" Finch has learned many lessons in his escapades throughout this novel by Harper Lee. Jem could be described as a boy trying to be a man. He tries to act tough, going out of his way to prove his masculinity to others, even going to touch the infamous Radley house in a dare from Dill, showing how he defines courage through childish and possible dangerous acts. However, later in the book, he is taught be Atticus what true courage is, that being to stand up to adversity despite how hard it is. This is shown when Atticus forces Jem to go to the house of Mrs. Dubose and read to her as payment for crushing the woman's flowers. After Mrs. Dubose dies, Atticus explains his reasoning to Jem: ""I wanted you to see something about her-I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do." (Page 112) Perhaps this lesson in courage will cause Jem to make more mature decisions in the future, regarding himself,his sister, his family, and all of those around him.



Jimmy, I do agree with your opinions, especially on Jem. I to agree that Jem's greatest coming of age moment was the coming of age debacle. But I kind of forgot about the run-ins with Miss Caroline. I can now see how this was a coming of age moment, where Scout goes to school for the first time and learns that all adults will not be open towards her, ans well as the lesson she learns from Atticus about how not to judge a book by its cover. Overall, a good response.
Flag Flag